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Legislate: All Bills

116 bills were returned.
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CA AB 100 - Philip Y. Ting
Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022.
05/04/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 11 a.m.
AB 100, Ting. Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022. The Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years.This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 by amending and adding items of appropriation and making other changes.The bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA AB 101 - Philip Y. Ting
Budget Act of 2023.
08/14/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 101, as amended, Ting. Budget Act of 2023. This bill would make appropriations for the support of state government for the 2023–24 fiscal year.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA AB 102 - Philip Y. Ting
Budget Act of 2023.
06/27/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4:30 p.m.
AB 102, Ting. Budget Act of 2023. The Budget Act of 2023 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2023–24 fiscal year.This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2023 by amending, adding, and repealing items of appropriation and making other changes.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA AB 1028 - Tina McKinnor
Reporting of crimes: mandated reporters.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 1028, as amended, McKinnor. Reporting of crimes: mandated reporters. Existing law requires a health practitioner, as defined, to make a report to law enforcement when they suspect a patient has suffered physical injury that is inflicted by the person’s own act or inflicted by another where the injury is by means of a firearm, or caused by assaultive or abusive conduct, including elder abuse, sexual assault, or torture. A violation of these provisions is punishable as a misdemeanor.This bill would, on and after January 1, 2025, remove the requirement that a health practitioner make a report to law enforcement when they suspect a patient has suffered physical injury caused by assaultive or abusive conduct, and instead only require that report if the health practitioner suspects a patient has suffered a wound or physical injury inflicted by the person’s own act or inflicted by another where the injury is by means of a firearm, a wound or physical injury resulting from child abuse, or a wound or physical injury resulting from elder abuse.The bill would, on and after January 1, 2025, instead require a health practitioner who suspects that a patient has suffered physical injury that is caused by domestic violence, as defined, to, among other things, provide brief counseling, education, or other support, and a warm handoff, as defined, or referral to local and national domestic violence or sexual violence advocacy services, as specified. The bill would, on and after January 1, 2025, specify that a health practitioner is not civilly or criminally liable for any report that is made in good faith and in compliance with these provisions.This bill would make other conforming changes.Because a violation of these requirements would be a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 103 - Philip Y. Ting
Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022.
06/30/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 33, Statutes of 2023.
AB 103, Ting. Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022. The Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years. This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 by amending and adding items of appropriation and making other changes. The bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA AB 104 - Philip Y. Ting
Budget Acts of 2022 and 2023.
09/13/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 104, as amended, Ting. Budget Acts of 2022 and 2023. The Budget Act of 2022 and the Budget Act of 2023 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2022–23 and 2023–24 fiscal years.This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2022 and the Budget Act of 2023 by amending and adding items of appropriation and making other changes.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA AB 1071 - Joshua Hoover
Teen dating violence prevention education: online information and resources.
07/11/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 1071, Hoover. Teen dating violence prevention education: online information and resources. Existing law requires each educational institution in the state to have a written policy on sexual harassment and to display that policy in a prominent location, as defined, in the main administrative building or other area of the educational institution’s campus or schoolsite. Existing law requires a copy of that policy, as it pertains to pupils, to be provided as part of any orientation program conducted for new and continuing pupils at the beginning of each quarter, semester, or summer session, as applicable. Existing law requires each schoolsite in a school district, county office of education, or charter school, serving pupils in any of grades 9 to 12, inclusive, to create a poster that notifies pupils of that policy and to prominently and conspicuously display the poster in each bathroom and locker room at the schoolsite, as provided.Existing law requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to post, and annually update, on the State Department of Education’s internet website, and provide to each school district, a list of statewide resources, including community-based organizations, that provide support to youth and their families who have been subjected to school-based discrimination, harassment, intimidation, or bullying, including school-based discrimination, harassment, intimidation, or bullying on the basis of religious affiliation, nationality, race, or ethnicity, or perceived religious affiliation, nationality, race, or ethnicity. Existing law requires the department’s internet website to also include a list of statewide resources for youth who have been affected by gangs, gun violence, and psychological trauma caused by violence at home, at school, and in the community.This bill would require the department to make (1) resources on abuse, including sexual, emotional, and physical abuse, and teen dating violence prevention for professional learning purposes, (2) information about local and national hotlines and services for youth experiencing teen dating violence, and (3) other relevant materials for parents, guardians, and other caretakers of pupils, available on its internet website.

CA AB 1130 - Marc Berman
Substance use disorder.
06/29/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 21, Statutes of 2023.
AB 1130, Berman. Substance use disorder. Existing law, the California Uniform Controlled Substances Act, regulates the distribution and use of controlled substances, as defined. Under the act, the State Department of Health Care Services is responsible for the administration of prevention, treatment, and recovery services for alcohol and drug abuse. Existing law, the Medical Practice Act, provides for the licensing and regulation of physicians and surgeons by the Medical Board of California. Existing law authorizes a physician and surgeon to prescribe, dispense, or administer prescription drugs, including prescription controlled substances, to an addict under their treatment for a purpose other than maintenance on, or detoxification from, prescription drugs or controlled substances and under specified conditions to an addict for purposes of maintenance on, or detoxification from, prescription drugs or controlled substances.This bill would revise and recast these provisions, among others, to delete the reference to an “addict” and instead replace it with the term “a person with substance use disorder,” among other technical nonsubstantive changes.

CA AB 1138 - Anthony J. Portantino Jr.
Postsecondary education: sexual assault and sexual violence prevention: medical examinations transportation services.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 1138, Weber. Postsecondary education: sexual assault and sexual violence prevention: medical examinations transportation services. Existing law requires the governing board of each community college district, the Trustees of the California State University, the Regents of the University of California, and the governing boards of independent postsecondary institutions, in order to receive state funds for student financial assistance, to enter into memoranda of understanding, agreements, or collaborative partnerships with existing on-campus and community-based organizations, to the extent feasible, to refer students for assistance or make services available to students, including counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, and legal assistance, and including resources for the accused.As a condition of receiving state funds for student financial assistance, this bill would require the trustees and the regents to ensure, to the extent feasible, that a student who seeks support after experiencing sexual violence receives information about the student’s options and rights to obtain a sexual assault forensic medical examination, as specified, and commencing with the 2025–26 school year, to the extent practicable and necessary, to provide to their students without charge and in a manner that protects student confidentiality, transportation to and from a local Sexual Assault Forensic Examination (SAFE) or Sexual Abuse Response Team (SART) exam center for a qualified health care provider to administer the sexual assault forensic medical evidence kit, as provided. The bill would require, on or before June 30, 2026, and biennially thereafter, as a condition of receiving state financial assistance funds, the trustees and the regents to submit a report to the Legislature on whether their respective institutions have provided transportation for students to and from a local SAFE or SART exam center for a qualified health care provider to administer the sexual assault forensic medical evidence kit and the manner in which students received the transportation.

CA AB 114 - House Budget Committee
Education finance: education omnibus budget trailer bill.
08/14/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & F.R.
AB 114, as amended, Committee on Budget. Education finance: education omnibus budget trailer bill. (1) Existing law establishes a public school financing system that requires state funding for school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools to be calculated pursuant to a local control funding formula, as specified. Existing law requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to annually calculate a county local control funding formula for each county superintendent of schools that includes, among other things, an alternative education grant, as specified. Existing law includes, among other things, a base grant based upon average daily attendance as a component of that alternative education grant.This bill would revise the alternative education grant by, among other things, increasing the base grant component of the alternative education grant, revising the calculation of average daily attendance for purposes of the alternative education grant, as specified, and establishing add-ons of $200,000 for each county office of education that operates a juvenile court school and $200,000 for each county office of education that operates a county community school. The bill would require the Superintendent to allocate $3,000 per unit of average daily attendance for a Student Support and Enrichment Block Grant, as provided. The bill would make these provisions applicable commencing with the 2023–24 fiscal year.(2) Existing law, commencing with the 2018–19 fiscal year, requires the Superintendent to add $200,000 and other specified amounts, that are dependent upon the number and size of school districts under its jurisdiction and that are determined to be in need of differentiated assistance, to a county superintendent of school’s local control funding formula allocation, as specified.This bill, commencing with the 2023–24 fiscal year, would increase the above-described add-on by $100,000.(3) Existing law, commencing with the 2015–16 fiscal year, requires the Superintendent to add $2,000,000 to the Los Angeles County Office of Education’s local control funding formula allocation for the purpose of supporting statewide professional development and leadership training for education professionals related to antibias education and the creation of inclusive and equitable schools.This bill would, commencing with the 2023–24 fiscal year, increase that add-on for the Los Angeles County Office of Education by $1,000,000 to instead be $3,000,000.(4) The Early Education Act requires the Superintendent to administer the California state preschool program. The act also requires the Superintendent, in consultation with the Director of Social Services and the executive director of the State Board of Education, to convene a statewide interest holder workgroup to provide recommendations on best practices for increasing access to high-quality universal preschool programs for 3- and 4-year-old children offered through a mixed-delivery model that provides equitable learning experiences across a variety of settings. The act requires the Superintendent, in consultation with the director, to provide a report to the appropriate fiscal and policy committees of the Legislature and the Department of Finance with the recommendations of the workgroup no later than January 15, 2023.This bill would delay the reporting of those recommendations described above to instead be no later than March 31, 2024.(5) Existing law establishes the California Prekindergarten Planning and Implementation Grant Program as a state early learning initiative with the goal of expanding access to classroom-based prekindergarten programs. Existing law appropriates $300,000,000 from the General Fund to the State Department of Education in both the 2021–22 fiscal year and the 2022–23 fiscal year for allocation to local educational agencies as base grants, enrollment grants, and supplemental grants, as specified.The bill would authorize the department to allocate or prorate un

CA AB 118 - House Budget Committee
Budget Act of 2023: health.
06/27/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4:30 p.m.
AB 118, Committee on Budget. Budget Act of 2023: health. (1) Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law requires a health care service plan to provide disclosures regarding the benefits, services, and terms of the plan contract, as specified, to provide the public, subscribers, and enrollees with a full and fair disclosure of the provisions of the plan.This bill would require the department to develop standard templates for the disclosure form and evidence of coverage, to include, among other things, standard definitions, benefit descriptions, and any other information that the director determines, consistent with the goals of providing fair disclosures of the provisions of a health care service plan. The bill would require the department to consult with the Department of Insurance and interested stakeholders in developing the standard templates. The bill would require health care service plans, beginning January 1, 2025, to use the standard templates for any disclosure form or evidence of coverage published or distributed, except as specified. Because a willful violation of these requirements is a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would authorize the department to develop standard templates for a schedule of benefits, an explanation of benefits, a cost-sharing summary, or any similar document. The bill would authorize the department to require health care service plans to use the standard templates, except as specified, and would authorize the director to require health care service plans to submit forms the health care service plan created based on the department’s templates for the purpose of compliance review. The bill would additionally specify that the department may implement these provisions by issuing and modifying templates and all-plan letters or similar instructions, without taking regulatory action. The bill would also update cross-references in various provisions.(2) Existing law requires a health care service plan contract or disability insurance policy to cover mental health and substance use disorder treatment, including medically necessary treatment of a mental health or substance use disorder provided by an in-network or out-of-network 988 center or mobile crisis team. Existing law prohibits a health care service plan or insurer from requiring prior authorization for medically necessary treatment of a mental health or substance use disorder provided by a 988 center or mobile crisis team.This bill would instead specify that mental health and substance use disorder treatment includes behavioral health crisis services that are provided by a 988 center, mobile crisis team or other provider of behavioral health crisis services. The bill would prohibit a health care service plan or health insurer from requiring prior authorization for behavioral health crisis stabilization services and care, but would authorize prior authorization for medically necessary mental health or substance use disorder services following stabilization from a behavioral health crisis addressed by services provided through the 988 system.This bill would require a health care service plan or health insurer that is contacted by a 988 center, mobile crisis team, or other provider of behavioral health crisis services to, within 30 minutes of initial contact, either authorize poststabilization care or inform the provider that it will arrange for the prompt transfer of the enrollee’s care to another provider. The bill would require the plan or insurer to reimburse a provider for poststabilization care in specified circumstances, including if the plan or insurer did not respond within 30 minutes to authorize care or arrange for transfer. The bill would require a plan or insurer to prominently display on its internet w

CA AB 1215 - Wendy Carrillo
Pets Assistance With Support Grant Program: homeless shelters: domestic violence shelters: pets.
01/30/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 1215, Wendy Carrillo. Pets Assistance With Support Grant Program: homeless shelters: domestic violence shelters: pets. Existing law establishes the Department of Housing and Community Development in the Business, Consumer Services, and Housing Agency and makes the department responsible for administering various housing programs throughout the state, including, among others, the Multifamily Housing Program, the Housing for a Healthy California Program, and the California Emergency Solutions Grants Program. This bill would require the department, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to develop and administer the Pets Assistance With Support Grant Program (PAWS), to award grants to qualified homeless shelters and qualified domestic violence shelters, as defined. The bill would require grant recipients to meet certain availability and service requirements as they relate to the pets of people experiencing homelessness and people escaping domestic violence. The bill would authorize the department to use up to 7% of the funds appropriated in the annual Budget Act for those purposes for its costs in administering the program.

CA AB 1226 - Matt Haney
Corrections: Placement of incarcerated persons.
07/11/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 1226, Haney. Corrections: Placement of incarcerated persons. Existing law requires the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to conduct assessments and examinations of all inmates who are newly committed to a state prison that include investigation of all pertinent circumstances of the person’s life, including, but not limited to, data regarding the inmate’s history of substance abuse, medical and mental health, education, family background, criminal activity, and social functioning.Existing law requires the Secretary of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to assign a prisoner to the institution of the appropriate security level and gender population nearest the prisoner’s home, unless other classification factors make such a placement unreasonable.This bill, for an incarcerated person with a parent and child relationship with a child under 18 years of age, as specified, or who is a guardian or relative caregiver of a child, as defined, would require the secretary to place the person in the correctional institution or facility that is located nearest to the primary place of residence of the person’s child, provided that the placement would be suitable and appropriate, would facilitate increased contact between the person and their child, and the incarcerated parent gives their consent to the placement. The bill would authorize the department to reevaluate an incarcerated person’s placement to determine whether existing orders should be modified, including whether the person’s child has moved to a place significantly nearer to an otherwise suitable and appropriate institution. The bill would allow an incarcerated person to request a review of their housing assignment when there is a change in the primary place of residence of the person’s child upon which the person’s housing assignment was based.

CA AB 1360 - Kevin Michael McCarty
Hope California: Secured Residential Treatment Pilot Program.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 1360, McCarty. Hope California: Secured Residential Treatment Pilot Program. Existing law authorizes a court to grant pretrial diversion to a defendant in specified cases, including when the defendant is suffering from a mental disorder, specified controlled substances crimes, and when the defendant was, or currently is, a member of the United States military.This bill would, until July 1, 2029, authorize the Counties of Sacramento and Yolo to offer secured residential treatment pilot programs, known as Hope California, for individuals suffering from substance use disorders (SUDs) who have been convicted of qualifying drug-motivated felony crimes, as specified. The bill would require the program to meet certain conditions relating to, among other things, a risk, needs, and biopsychosocial assessment, a comprehensive curriculum, a determination by a judge of the length of treatment, data collection, licensing and monitoring of the facility by the State Department of Health Care Services, and reporting to the department and the Legislature.The bill would require the judge to offer the defendant voluntary participation in the pilot programs, as an alternative to a jail or prison sentence otherwise imposed, if the defendant’s crime was caused, in whole or in part, by the defendant’s SUD, the crime was not a sex crime, serious or violent felony, nonviolent drug possession, domestic violence, or driving under the influence, and the judge makes their determination based on the recommendations of the treatment providers, on a finding by the county health and human services agency that the defendant’s participation would be appropriate, and on a specified report prepared with input from interested parties. Under the bill, the defendant would be eligible to receive credits for participation in the program, as specified.The bill would set forth a procedure for the transfer of a participant out of the secured residential treatment program based on the recommendations of the treatment providers or program administrators or based on the participant’s request, as specified.If the participant successfully completes the court-ordered drug treatment, as determined by treatment providers pursuant to the pilot program, the bill would require the court to set aside the conviction and to dismiss the accusation or information against the defendant and would authorize the court to set aside the conviction and to dismiss the accusation or information of any previous drug possession or drug use crimes on the participant’s record.Existing law requires the Department of Justice to maintain state summary criminal history information, as defined, and to furnish this information to various state and local government officers, officials, and other prescribed entities, if needed in the course of their duties. Existing law requires the Department of Justice, as part of the state summary criminal history information, to disseminate every conviction rendered against an applicant unless the conviction falls within an exception.This bill would exempt from dissemination a conviction that has been set aside pursuant to the above provisions.Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services, under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services, including mental health and substance use disorder services, pursuant to a schedule of benefits. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Existing law, with certain exceptions based in part on the type and location of the service, provides for the suspension of Medi-Cal benefits to an inmate of a public institution.This bill would, to the extent permitted under federal and state law, make treatment provided to a participant during the program reimbursable under the Medi-Cal program, if the participant is a Medi-Cal beneficiary and the treatment is a covered benefit under the Medi-Cal pr

CA AB 1386 - Jesse Gabriel
Veterans housing: tenant referrals.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 1386, Gabriel. Veterans housing: tenant referrals. Existing law, the Veterans Housing and Homeless Prevention Act of 2014, requires the California Housing Finance Agency, the Department of Housing and Community Development, and the Department of Veterans Affairs (referred to collectively as “the departments”) to establish and implement programs that focus on veterans at risk for homelessness or experiencing temporary or chronic homelessness, as specified. In this regard, existing law requires the departments to establish and implement programs that, among other things, ensure projects combine housing and supportive services. Existing law requires the departments to ensure at least 50% of funds awarded for capital development are used to provide housing to veterans with extremely low incomes, and requires that at least 60% of units funded targeting extremely low income households are supportive housing.This bill would authorize an entity tasked with making referrals of units targeted to extremely low income households to submit a petition to the departments requesting authority to lease the qualified unit to a secondary tenant, as defined, if a qualified entity is unable to locate, match, or otherwise place a qualified tenant in a qualified unit with 60 days of the unit becoming available. The bill would require a qualified unit that is leased to a secondary tenant to be redesignated to an area median income level commensurate with the income level of the secondary tenant and would require the secondary tenant to pay rent commensurate with their household income’s percentage of the area medium income. The bill would, 12 months after a petition is approved, require the next available comparable unit to be rented to a qualified tenant at 30% of the median income. The bill would require a qualified entity tasked with making referrals to these units to make a good faith effort to match a tenant with an extremely low income before submitting a petition, document these good faith efforts, submit this documentation as a part of the petition, and make this documentation available to the housing sponsor and, upon request, to the departments. The bill would prohibit the departments from approving a petition if it would result in changes that may impact the project’s regulatory agreement, as specified.The bill would require the departments to create a standardized form for the submission of petitions described above. The bill would require the departments, upon receipt of a petition, to (1) review the petition and decide if the qualified unit is eligible to accept secondary tenants under all applicable guidelines, rules, and regulations, and (2) provide a written determination approving or denying the petition no later than 30 days after receipt of the petition.Existing law establishes the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee, composed of specified members, and requires that the California Tax Credit Allocation Committee, among other things, allocate specified federal low-income housing tax credits, as provided.This bill, for purposes of supportive housing units that are restricted to extremely low income veterans pursuant to a regulatory agreement with the committee, would authorize an entity tasked with making referrals of those units targeted to extremely low income households to match prospective secondary tenants with incomes at or below 60% of the area median income that are receiving income as a result of service-connected disability benefits if a qualified tenant is unable to be matched to and accept placement in an available unit within 28 days of the unit becoming available. If a secondary tenant is unable to be matched to and accept placement in an available unit within 14 days, the bill would authorize the entity to match a veteran experiencing homelessness with an income at or below 60% of the area median income, regardless of the source of the income, in an available unit. The bill would require a qualified unit tha

CA AB 1468 - Bill Essayli
Protective orders.
02/01/2024 - Died at Desk.
AB 1468, as introduced, Essayli. Protective orders. Existing law establishes the Domestic Violence Prevention Act for the purpose of preventing acts of domestic violence, abuse, and sexual abuse and providing for a separation of the persons involved in the domestic violence for a period sufficient to enable those persons to seek a resolution of the causes of the violence. Existing law authorizes a court to issue a protective order enjoining a party from engaging in specified acts, including threatening or harassing the other party or disturbing the peace of the other party. This bill would make a technical, nonsubstantive change to those provisions.

CA AB 1497 - Matt Haney
Criminal procedure.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1497, as amended, Haney. Criminal procedure. (1) Existing law, in a criminal trial, allows evidence of mental disease, mental defect, or mental disorder solely for the issue of whether or not the accused actually formed a required specific intent, premeditated, deliberated, or harbored malice aforethought, when a specific intent crime is charged.This bill would instead allow that evidence for the issue of whether or not the accused actually formed the required mental state for the crime that is charged, including whether or not the accused committed a willful act, premeditated, deliberated, harbored malice aforethought, acted knowingly, acted maliciously, or acted with conscious disregard for human life.(2) Existing law allows a person who was arrested or convicted of a nonviolent offense while they were a victim of human trafficking, intimate partner violence, or sexual violence, to petition the court, under penalty of perjury, for vacatur relief. To receive that relief, existing law requires that the person establish, by clear and convincing evidence, that the arrest or conviction was the direct result of being a victim of human trafficking, intimate partner violence, or sexual violence, which demonstrates that the person lacked the requisite intent to commit the offense. Existing law requires the court, under those circumstances, to find that the person lacked the requisite intent to commit the offense and to vacate the conviction as invalid due to legal defect at the time of the arrest or conviction.This bill would allow that relief for a person arrested or convicted of any offense. By expanding the scope of the crime of perjury, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.(3) Existing law creates an affirmative defense against a charge of a crime that the person was coerced to commit the offense as a direct result of being a victim of human trafficking, intimate partner violence, or sexual violence at the time of the offense and when the person had reasonable fear of harm. Existing law prohibits this defense from being used with respect to a violent felony, as defined.This bill would allow that defense to be used with respect to a violent felony.(4) If a court issues an order for a person who was arrested or convicted of an offense while they were a victim of intimate partner violence or sexual violence, existing law requires the court to order the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction over the offense, the Department of Justice, and any law enforcement agency that arrested the petitioner or participated in the arrest of the petitioner to seal their records of the arrest and the court order to seal and destroy the records within 3 years from the date of the arrest, or within one year after the court order is granted, whichever occurs later, and thereafter to destroy their records of the arrest and the court order to seal and destroy those records.This bill would require the court to also order any law enforcement agency that has taken action or maintains records because of the offense, including, but not limited to, departments of probation, rehabilitation, corrections, and parole, to seal and destroy their records. The bill would require the agencies mentioned above to seal their records of arrest and court order to seal and destroy the records within one year from the date of arrest, or within 90 days after the court order is granted, whichever occurs later. The bill would require the agencies to destroy these records within one year of the date of the court order. The bill would also require the Department of Justice to notify the petitioner and the petitioner’s counsel that the department has complied with the order to seal the arrest records by the applicable deadline.(5) Existing law requires the court, when a judgment of imprisonment is imposed and specifies 3 possible terms, to impose the middle term unless there are circumstances in aggravation or mitigation of the crime. Existing law requires t

CA AB 1536 - Michael A. Gipson
Cash Assistance Program for Aged, Blind, and Disabled Immigrants.
01/30/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 1536, Juan Carrillo. Cash Assistance Program for Aged, Blind, and Disabled Immigrants. Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services to establish and supervise a county- or county consortia-administered program to provide cash assistance for aged, blind, or disabled legal immigrants who are not citizens who, due to their immigration status, are not eligible for the Supplemental Security Income/State Supplementary Program for the Aged, Blind, and Disabled, also known as SSI/SSP benefits. Under existing law, an individual is eligible for this program if their immigration status meets SSI/SSP eligibility criteria but they are not eligible for those benefits solely due to their immigration status, as specified. Existing law also requires any person who is found to be eligible by the department for federally funded SSI to apply for SSI benefits.This bill would expand eligibility for that program to aged, blind, and disabled individuals regardless of immigration status if the individual meets the eligibility criteria for the program and is not eligible solely due to their immigration status. This bill would exempt individuals who are not qualified immigrants, as specified, from having to apply for SSI in order to receive benefits. The bill would also delete several inoperative provisions. The bill would make the implementation of these substantive changes contingent upon an appropriation for its express purposes. By expanding county duties under the program, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 1644 - Buffy Wicks
Medi-Cal: medically supportive food and nutrition services.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 1644, as amended, Bonta. Medi-Cal: medically supportive food and nutrition services. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions.Existing law requires the department to establish the Medically Tailored Meals Pilot Program and the Short-Term Medically Tailored Meals Intervention Services Program, to operate in specified counties and during limited periods for the purpose of providing medically tailored meal intervention services to eligible Medi-Cal beneficiaries with certain health conditions, including congestive heart failure, cancer, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or renal disease.Existing law, subject to implementation of the California Advancing and Innovating Medi-Cal (CalAIM) initiative, authorizes a Medi-Cal managed care plan to elect to cover community supports approved by the department as cost effective and medically appropriate in a comprehensive risk contract that are in lieu of applicable Medi-Cal state plan services. Under existing law, community supports that the department is authorized to approve include, among other things, medically supportive food and nutrition services, including medically tailored meals.This bill would make medically supportive food and nutrition interventions, as defined, a covered benefit under the Medi-Cal program, upon issuance of final guidance by the department. The bill would require medically supportive food and nutrition interventions to be covered when determined to be medically necessary by a health care provider or health care plan, as specified. In order to qualify for coverage under the Medi-Cal program, the bill would require a patient to be offered at least 3 of 6 specified medically supportive food and nutrition interventions and for the interventions to be provided for a minimum duration of 12 weeks, as specified. The bill would only provide coverage for nutrition support interventions when paired with the provision of food through one of the 3 offered interventions. The bill would require a health care provider to match the acuity of a patient’s condition to the intensity and duration of the medically supportive food and nutrition intervention and include culturally appropriate foods whenever possible.The bill would establish a medically supportive food and nutrition benefit advisory workgroup to advise the department in developing final guidance related to eligible populations, the duration and dosage of medically supportive food and nutrition interventions, the ratesetting process, determination of permitted providers, and continuing education for health care providers, as specified. The bill would require the workgroup to include certain stakeholders knowledgeable in medically supportive food and nutrition interventions and stakeholders from Medi-Cal consumer advocacy organizations. The bill would require the workgroup to meet at least quarterly and would require the department to issue final guidance on or before July 1, 2026. The bill would also include findings and declarations of the Legislature relating to the need for medically supportive food and nutrition intervention coverage under the Medi-Cal program.

CA AB 1697 - Pilar Schiavo
Uniform Electronic Transactions Act.
09/13/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 1697, Schiavo. Uniform Electronic Transactions Act. Existing law, the Uniform Electronic Transactions Act, provides that a record or signature may not be denied legal effect or enforceability solely because it is in electronic form. The act exempts from its provisions, among other things, specific transactions, including an authorization for the release of medical information by a provider of health care, health care service plan, pharmaceutical company, or contractor and an authorization for the release of genetic test results by a health care service plan under the Confidentiality of Medical Information Act.This bill would delete the exemption for the above-described authorizations under the Confidentiality of Medical Information Act and would make conforming changes.Existing law requires that the authorization for release of medical information contain a specific end date.This bill would, instead, require that the authorization contain an expiration date or event, as defined, and would limit the duration of the authorization to one year or less, except as provided. The bill would also require that the person to whom the medical information pertains receives a copy of the authorization for that authorization to be valid.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 56.05 of the Civil Code proposed by AB 254 to be operative only if this bill and AB 254 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.

CA AB 1754 - House Judiciary Committee
Maintenance of the codes.
07/25/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4 p.m.
AB 1754, Committee on Judiciary. Maintenance of the codes. Existing law directs the Legislative Counsel to advise the Legislature from time to time as to legislation necessary to maintain the codes.This bill would make nonsubstantive changes in various provisions of the law to effectuate the recommendations made by the Legislative Counsel to the Legislature.

CA AB 1756 - House Judiciary Committee
Committee on Judiciary: judiciary omnibus.
09/12/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling. (Ayes 79. Noes 0.).
AB 1756, as amended, Committee on Judiciary. Committee on Judiciary: judiciary omnibus. (1) Existing law requires the Attorney General to maintain the Registry of Charitable Trusts, a register of charitable corporations, unincorporated associations, and trustees holding property for charitable purposes and fundraisers. Existing law also establishes the Registry of Charitable Trusts Fund in the State Treasury, and directs all registration fees, registration renewal fees, and late fees or other fees paid to the Department of Justice in relation to the Registry of Charitable Trusts be deposited into the fund. This bill would change the name of the Registry of Charitable Trusts to the Registry of Charities and Fundraisers. The bill would also change the name of the Registry of Charitable Trusts Fund to the Registry of Charities and Fundraisers Fund. The bill would also make conforming changes.(2) Existing law governs motor vehicle conditional sale contracts, as defined, and requires sellers of motor vehicles to make certain disclosures to buyers. Existing law authorizes a buyer to pay the entire indebtedness under the contract at any time before maturity without penalty, regardless of any contrary contract provision, as provided. Existing law provides for the determination of the outstanding obligation of the buyer if the indebtedness is satisfied before its maturity through surrender of the motor vehicle, repossession of the motor vehicle, redemption of the motor vehicle after repossession, or any judgment, and requires that the buyer’s outstanding obligation be computed as of the date the holder recovers the value of the motor vehicle through disposition thereof or judgment is entered or as of the date the holder takes possession of the motor vehicle, as applicable.This bill would make a technical change to these provisions relating to the determination of a buyer’s outstanding obligation if the indebtedness is satisfied by surrender of the motor vehicle, repossession of the motor vehicle, redemption of the motor vehicle after repossession, or any judgment.(3) Existing law governs the offer, sale, provision, or administration, in connection with a motor vehicle conditional sale contract, of a guaranteed asset protection waiver (GAP waiver), defined to mean an optional contractual obligation under which a seller agrees, for additional consideration, to cancel or waive all or part of amounts due on the buyer’s conditional sale contract subject to existing law in the event of a total loss or unrecovered theft of the motor vehicle specified in the conditional sale contract. Existing law also governs the termination of a GAP waiver, including the refund of GAP waiver costs on a termination, to be calculated as prescribed. Under existing law, if the termination occurs later than 30 days after the date the buyer purchased the GAP waiver, the buyer is entitled to a refund of the unearned GAP waiver charges, calculated on a pro rata basis according to a prescribed formula that uses figures relating to the period from the GAP waiver termination date to the original full term date of the conditional sale contract and to the original term of the conditional sale contract. A willful violation of these provisions is a crime.This bill, if the original full term of the conditional sale contract exceeded the original full term of the GAP waiver as of the date the buyer purchased the GAP waiver, would require in that case a formula that uses figures relating to the period from the GAP waiver termination date to the original full term date of the GAP waiver and to the original term of the GAP waiver. Because a willful violation of this provision would be a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. (4) Existing law provides that, in a civil action, before filing a demurrer, motion to strike, or motion for judgment on the pleadings, a party is required to meet and confer, in person or by telephone, with the opposing party to try

CA AB 1780 - Lori D. Wilson
Independent institutions of higher education: legacy and donor preference in admissions: prohibition.
04/09/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HIGHER ED.
AB 1780, as amended, Ting. Independent institutions of higher education: legacy and donor preference in admissions: prohibition. Existing law establishes independent institutions of higher education as one of the segments of postsecondary education in the state.Existing law, the Cal Grant Program, establishes the Cal Grant A Entitlement Awards, the Cal Grant B Entitlement Awards, the California Community College Expanded Entitlement Awards, the California Community College Transfer Entitlement Awards, the Competitive Cal Grant A and B Awards, the Cal Grant C Awards, and the Cal Grant T Awards under the administration of the Student Aid Commission.The Cal Grant Reform Act revises and recasts the provisions establishing and governing the existing Cal Grant Program into a new Cal Grant Program. Existing law specifies that the act becomes operative only if General Fund moneys over the multiyear forecasts beginning in the 2024–25 fiscal year are available to support ongoing augmentations and actions, and if funding is provided in the annual Budget Act to implement the act.This bill would prohibit an independent institution of higher education, as defined, from providing a legacy preference or donor preference in admissions, as defined, to an applicant as part of the regular or early action admission process. The bill would make a violation of the prohibition subject to a civil penalty equal to the amount the independent institution of higher education receives in the year before the violation occurred pursuant to the Cal Grant Program or the Cal Grant Reform Act, as applicable. The bill would require the civil penalty to be assessed and recovered by the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education and deposited into the Cal Grant Account, which the bill would establish in the State Treasury. The bill would require funds in the account, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to be available for purposes of funding the Cal Grant Program or the Cal Grant Reform Act. The bill would require the Civil Rights Department to post the names of the independent institutions of higher education that violate the prohibition on its internet website. The bill would require, on or before June 30, 2026, and annually thereafter, an independent institution of higher education to report specified information about admitted students to the Legislature.

CA AB 1812 - Jesse Gabriel
Budget Act of 2024.
01/16/2024 - Referred to Com. on BUDGET.
AB 1812, as introduced, Gabriel. Budget Act of 2024. This bill would make appropriations for the support of state government for the 2024–25 fiscal year.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA AB 1906 - Michael A. Gipson
California Law Revision Commission: persons with disabilities: terminology.
04/10/2024 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Referred to suspense file.
AB 1906, as amended, Gipson. California Law Revision Commission: persons with disabilities: terminology. Existing law establishes the California Law Revision Commission to, among other things, examine the law for defects or anachronisms and recommend changes to modify or eliminate antiquated or inequitable rules of law. Existing law requires the commission to study any topic that the Legislature, by concurrent resolution or statute, refers to the commission. Existing law establishes the Committee on Revision of the Penal Code, within the commission, to study and make recommendations related to the Penal Code to achieve various objectives, including simplifying criminal law and procedure.Existing law uses the terms “dependent adult” and “dependent person” to refer to a person, regardless of whether the person lives independently, who is between the ages of 18 and 64 and has physical or mental limitations that restrict their ability to carry out normal activities or to protect their rights, as specified. Existing law uses those terms in various provisions related to, among other topics, prohibitions on, prescribes penalties for, mandated reporting of, and settlements, protective orders, and law enforcement training related to, the commission of specified offenses committed against those persons.Existing federal law requires the Governor to designate a private nonprofit corporation in this state for the protection and advocacy of persons with disabilities, as specified. Existing state law refers to this entity as “the protection and advocacy agency.”This bill would require the California Law Revision Commission, with input from stakeholders, including the protection and advocacy agency, to complete and submit to the Legislature a study on how to remove the terms “dependent adult” and “dependent person” from existing code sections, including those that use the term “dependent” in conjunction with the term “elder,” as specified. The bill would require the commission, as part of the study, to convene a working group that includes the protection and advocacy agency, persons described by those terms, and groups representing those persons. The bill would require the study to include recommendations on how to replace the terms “dependent adult” and “dependent person” with new terminology that would respectfully describe those persons and would preserve the legal rights and protections of those and other persons, as specified.The bill would make related findings and declarations.

CA AB 1931 - Diane B. Dixon
Criminal procedure: protective orders.
03/19/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 1931, as amended, Dixon. Criminal procedure: protective orders. Existing law allows the court to issue a protective order restraining a defendant from any contact with the victim if the defendant has been convicted of a crime of domestic violence, human trafficking, a crime in furtherance of a criminal street gang, or a registerable sex offense. Under existing law, the protective order may be valid for up to 10 years, as determined by the court.This bill would additionally allow the court to issue a permanent protective order restraining a defendant from any contact with the victim if the defendant has been convicted of any serious or violent felony, as defined, or any felony requiring registration as a sex offender. The bill would also authorize the court to permanently extend certain previously issued orders under certain circumstances. The bill would require the Judicial Council to develop forms, instructions, and rules relating to these orders.The bill would make other conforming changes.By authorizing the issuance of protective orders in certain circumstances and the extension of certain protective orders, a violation of which is punishable as a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 1956 - Eloise Gomez Reyes
Victim services.
04/10/2024 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Referred to suspense file.
AB 1956, as amended, Reyes. Victim services. Existing federal law, the Victims of Crime Act of 1984, creates the Crime Victims Fund and authorizes federal financial assistance to states for the purpose of supporting eligible crime victim assistance programs. Existing law creates various programs under the Office of Emergency Services related to crime prevention and education, including, among other things, programs concerning family violence prevention and domestic violence prevention.This bill would require the office to allocate funds, upon appropriation by the Legislature, to fill the gap in the federal Victims of Crime Act funding and to prioritize continuity and stability of crime victim services if the federal grant funding that is awarded to the office is 10% or more lower than the amount awarded in the prior year. The bill would require the office to regularly consult, collaborate with, and consider the recommendations regarding allocation of funding from the Victims of Crime Act Steering Committee.

CA AB 2053 - Josh Hoover
Pupil instruction: abusive relationships.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass. To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 14. Noes 0.) (April 10).
AB 2053, as introduced, Mathis. Pupil instruction: abusive relationships. Existing law, the California Healthy Youth Act, requires school districts to ensure that all pupils in grades 7 to 12, inclusive, receive comprehensive sexual health education and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention education, as specified. Under the act, this instruction includes, among other things, information about adolescent relationship abuse and intimate partner violence, including the early warning signs thereof.This bill would require the comprehensive sexual health education and HIV prevention education to also include information about resources available to pupils related to adolescent relationship abuse and intimate partner violence, including the National Domestic Violence Hotline and local domestic violence hotlines, as provided. By imposing additional duties on school districts, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 221 - Philip Y. Ting
Budget Act of 2023.
01/26/2023 - Referred to Com. on BUDGET.
AB 221, as introduced, Ting. Budget Act of 2023. This bill would make appropriations for the support of state government for the 2023–24 fiscal year.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA AB 2218 - Miguel Santiago
Enhanced Services for Asylees and Vulnerable Noncitizens (ESAVN) program.
03/12/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HUM. S.
AB 2218, as amended, Santiago. Enhanced Services for Asylees and Vulnerable Noncitizens (ESAVN) program. Existing law, subject to an appropriation in the annual Budget Act, establishes the Enhanced Services for Asylees and Vulnerable Noncitizens (ESAVN) program to provide resettlement services for persons granted asylum by the United States Attorney General or the Secretary of Homeland Security or who are eligible to receive refugee cash assistance and services as victims of crime. Existing law requires the program, under the administration of the State Department of Social Services, to provide specified services for up to 90 days within the first year following a person’s grant of asylum or eligibility for services as a victim of a crime, respectively. Existing law requires that grants or contracts awarded pursuant to the program be executed only with nonprofit organizations that meet specified requirements, including that an organization have as least 3 years of experience providing both case management services and culturally and linguistically appropriate services.This bill would instead require that a nonprofit organization have at least one year of providing the above-described services. Existing law requires the department, in collaboration with service providers, to determine outcome metrics to define program success. This bill would require the department to collect data related to those outcome metrics from grantees and post the findings on the department’s internet website.

CA AB 2224 - Miguel Santiago
Human services: special immigrant juvenile status.
04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on JUD. (Ayes 5. Noes 0.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on JUD.
AB 2224, as amended, Santiago. Human services: special immigrant juvenile status. Existing federal law establishes a procedure for providing certain immigrants with the classification of special immigrant juvenile status (SIJS) and authorizes those persons to apply for an adjustment of status to that of a lawful permanent resident within the United States. Under federal law, SIJS criteria include, among other things, that the immigrant’s reunification with one or both parents is not viable due to abuse, neglect, abandonment, or a similar basis found under state law, and for whom it would not be in their best interest to be returned to their or their parent’s previous country of nationality or country of last habitual residence. Under existing state law, a superior court has jurisdiction to make the factual findings necessary to enable a child to petition the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services for classification as a special immigrant juvenile under those federal provisions.If the court issues an order making the necessary determinations regarding SIJS, this bill would require that a certified copy of the order be provided to the petitioner on the same day the order was issued by the court.Existing law authorizes the probate court to appoint a guardian of the person of an unmarried individual who is 18 years of age or older, but who has not yet attained 21 years of age, in connection with a petition to make the necessary findings regarding SIJS, as specified, if the proposed ward consents. Existing law authorizes the petition for guardianship to be filed by parent, relative, or any other person on behalf of the proposed ward, or by the proposed ward. Existing law authorizes a relative or any other person on behalf of a ward, or the ward, to file a petition to extend the guardianship of the person for a period of time not to extend beyond the ward reaching 21 years of age.This bill would authorize a court to appoint a parent as the guardian of the person of their unmarried child who is 18 years of age or older, but who has not yet attained 21 years of age, under those provisions. The bill would clarify that a parent is authorized to file a petition to extend the guardianship of the ward under those provisions. The bill would also make technical and conforming changes to related provisions.Under existing state law, noncitizen victims of trafficking, domestic violence, and other serious crimes, as defined, are eligible for certain public social services and health care services to the same extent as individuals who are admitted to the United States as refugees. Existing law requires the discontinuance of those services if there is a final administrative denial of a visa application, as specified. Existing law requires that benefits and services under those provisions be paid from state funds to the extent federal funding is unavailable.This bill would expand those services to individuals who have filed a petition with the appropriate federal agency for SIJS, and to individuals who received, or who made or are preparing to make a request for, an order from the superior court making the necessary determinations to enable them to file that petition for SIJS. The bill would require the discontinuance of the services if there is a final administrative denial of all pending applications or petitions by an individual, as specified. The bill would make conforming changes to related provisions. By increasing duties for counties to administer and determine eligibility for public social services and health care services, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law continuously appropriates moneys from the General Fund to defray a portion of county costs under the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program.This bill would instead provide that the continuous appropriation would not be made for purposes of implementing these provisions.The California Constitution requires the

CA AB 2246 - James C. Ramos
Medical Practice Act: health care providers: qualified autism service paraprofessionals.
03/19/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & P.
AB 2246, as amended, Ramos. Medical Practice Act: health care providers: qualified autism service paraprofessionals. Existing law, the Medical Practice Act, establishes the Medical Board of California and charges it with administrative and enforcement duties related to the provision of medical services under the act. Existing law establishes requirements for the delivery of medical services, including via telehealth by specified health care providers. A violation of the act is a crime.Under existing law, a “health care provider,” for purpose of the act, includes a qualified autism service provider or a qualified autism service professional that is certified by a national entity, as specified.This bill would expand that definition of “health care provider” to also include a qualified autism service paraprofessional. By expanding the scope of a crime under the act, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2270 - Brian K. Maienschein
Healing arts: continuing education: menopausal mental or physical health.
04/10/2024 - Read second time and amended.
AB 2270, as amended, Maienschein. Healing arts: continuing education: menopausal mental or physical health. Existing law, the Medical Practice Act, establishes the Medical Board of California and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of physicians and surgeons, including osteopathic physicians and surgeons. Existing law, the Nursing Practice Act, establishes the Board of Registered Nursing and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of the practice of nursing. Existing law, the Psychology Licensing Law, establishes the Board of Psychology and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of psychologists. Existing law, the Physician Assistant Practice Act, establishes the Physician Assistant Board and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of physician assistants.Existing law, the Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Act, the Clinical Social Worker Practice Act, the Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor Act, and the Educational Psychologist Practice Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of the practices of marriage and family therapy, clinical social work, professional clinical counseling, and education psychology, respectively, by the Board of Behavioral Sciences.Existing law establishes continuing education requirements for all of these various healing arts practitioners.This bill would require the above-specified boards, in determining their continuing education requirements, to consider including a course in menopausal mental or physical health.

CA AB 2343 - Pilar Schiavo
CalWORKs: childcare programs.
02/26/2024 - Referred to Com. on HUM. S.
AB 2343, as introduced, Schiavo. CalWORKs: childcare programs. Existing federal law provides for allocation of federal funds through the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant program to eligible states. Existing law provides for the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program, under which, through a combination of state and county funds and federal funds received through the TANF program, each county provides cash assistance and other benefits to qualified low-income families. Existing law provides for state-subsidized childcare programs and childcare for recipients of benefits under the CalWORKs program and establishes 3 stages of childcare services managed by county welfare departments and agencies contracting with the State Department of Social Services. This bill would authorize an administrator of a childcare program providing services during the first and 2nd stages of childcare to provide additional enhanced support and navigation services to those recipients experiencing homelessness, escaping domestic violence, or both. The bill would also authorize the administrator of a childcare program to partner with specified agencies to provide those services.

CA AB 2354 - Mia Bonta
Criminal procedure: sentencing.
03/19/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 2354, as amended, Bonta. Criminal procedure: sentencing. Existing law allows a person who was arrested or convicted of a nonviolent offense while they were a victim of human trafficking, intimate partner violence, or sexual violence, to petition the court, under penalty of perjury, for vacatur relief. Existing law requires, to receive that relief, that the crime for which the person was arrested or convicted was a nonviolent offense and that the person establish, by clear and convincing evidence, that the arrest or conviction was the direct result of being a victim of human trafficking, intimate partner violence, or sexual violence. Existing law authorizes the court to vacate the conviction if it concludes that the petitioner was a victim of one of those crimes at the time of the alleged commission of the offense, the arrest was a direct result of being a victim of that offense, and the vacatur is in the best interest of justice.This bill would allow that relief for a person arrested or convicted of any offense. The bill would also authorize relief for a person whose offense was related, rather than directly related, to being a victim of human trafficking, intimate partner violence, or sexual violence. The bill would remove the requirement that the court find that vacating the conviction is in the best interest of justice in order to vacate the arrest or conviction. Because this bill would authorize more petitions to be filed under penalty of perjury, by expanding the scope of the crime of perjury, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.If a court issues an order for a person who was arrested or convicted of an offense while they were a victim of intimate partner violence or sexual violence, existing law requires the court to order the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction over the offense, the Department of Justice, and any law enforcement agency that arrested the petitioner or participated in the arrest of the petitioner to seal their records of the arrest and the court order to seal and destroy the records within 3 years from the date of the arrest, or within one year after the court order is granted, whichever occurs later, and thereafter to destroy their records of the arrest and the court order to seal and destroy those records.This bill would require the court to also order any law enforcement agency that has taken action or maintains records related to or because of the offense, including, but not limited to, departments of probation, rehabilitation, corrections, and parole, to seal and destroy their records. The bill would require those agencies to seal their records of arrest and the court order to seal and destroy the records within one year from the date of arrest, or within 90 days after the court order is granted, whichever occurs later. The bill would require the agencies to destroy these records within one year of the date of the court order. The bill would also require the Department of Justice to notify the petitioner and the petitioner’s counsel that the department has complied with the order to seal the arrest records by the applicable deadline.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2412 - Eloise Gomez Reyes
Healing arts: California Body Contouring Council: practitioners.
04/09/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & P.
AB 2412, as amended, Reyes. Healing arts: California Body Contouring Council: practitioners. Existing law, the Massage Therapy Act, regulates massage practitioners and therapists who administer massage, defined as the scientific manipulation of the soft tissues, for compensation. Existing law creates the California Massage Therapy Council. Existing law specifies that it is an unfair business practice for a person to hold oneself out or to use the title of “certified massage therapist” or “certified massage practitioner” unless that person currently holds an active and valid certificate issued by the council pursuant to these provisions.This bill, the California Body Contouring Practitioner Act, would define body contouring as noninvasive, nonmedical treatment intended to shape or contour the fatty areas of the body, as specified. The bill would create the California Body Contouring Council (council) for the purpose of regulating the practice of body contouring. The bill would require the council to issue certificates of completion to individuals who complete a certain educational course, permits to be a California Certified and Permitted Body Contouring Practitioner, permits to maintain a specified physical location, and mobile permits, as prescribed. The bill would require the council to be governed by a board of directors comprised of 4 individuals. The bill would establish an advisory board comprised of 14 members, as specified, and would make the advisory board responsible for advising the board of directors.This bill would require the council to develop and make available to students on an internet website 5 online, 40-hour educational modules composing a 5-week, 200-hour, physician-approved course in the practice of body contouring. The bill would require a student who successfully completes the course of instruction to receive a certificate of completion issued by the council for the purpose of qualifying that person for a permit to practice body contouring. To become a practitioner of body contouring, the bill would require an applicant to submit an application of the council and provide the council with satisfactory evidence that they have met prescribed requirements, including payment of certain fees that cover the council’s reasonable regulatory cots of administering the program.This bill would require permits to practice body contouring, premises permits, and mobile permits to be renewed annually. The bill would establish fees for specified permits, including an initial fee for a permit to practice body contouring that does not exceed $495, and would require those fees to cover the council’s reasonable regulatory costs of administering the program. The bill would require practitioners to comply with specified requirements, including, submitting to inspection and investigation by the council, adhering to the ethical standards prescribed by the council, and not exceeding the legal scope of their permit, among other things. The bill would make it unlawful for any person to falsely advertise that they or any other individual is a California Certified and Permitted Body Contouring Practitioner and deem engaging in that or other prohibited behavior unfair competition pursuant to other specified provisions of law.

CA AB 2415 - Michael A. Gipson
Cash assistance for aged, blind, and disabled immigrants.
03/19/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HUM. S.
AB 2415, as amended, Juan Carrillo. Cash assistance for aged, blind, and disabled immigrants. Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services to establish and supervise a county or county consortia-administered program to provide cash assistance for aged, blind, or disabled legal immigrants who are not citizens who, due to their immigration status, are not eligible for the Supplemental Security Income/State Supplementary Program for the Aged, Blind, and Disabled, also known as SSI/SSP benefits. Under existing law, an individual is eligible for this program if their immigration status meets SSI/SSP eligibility criteria but they are not eligible for those benefits solely due to their immigration status, as specified. Existing law also requires any person who is found to be eligible by the department for federally funded SSI to apply for SSI benefits.This bill would expand eligibility for that program to aged, blind, and disabled individuals regardless of immigration status if the individual meets the eligibility criteria for the program and is not eligible solely due to their immigration status. This bill would exempt individuals who are not qualified immigrants, as specified, from having to apply for SSI in order to receive benefits. The bill would also delete several inoperative provisions. The bill would make the implementation of these substantive changes contingent upon an appropriation for its express purposes. By expanding county duties under the program, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2420 - Josh Lowenthal
Criminal records: sealing.
03/19/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 6. Noes 0.) (March 19). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2420, as introduced, Lowenthal. Criminal records: sealing. Existing law allows a person who has suffered an arrest that did not result in a conviction, or resulted in a conviction that was subsequently vacated or reversed on appeal, to petition the court to have their arrest and related records sealed. Existing law allows a person who has fulfilled the conditions of probation, or was convicted of a misdemeanor and not granted probation, to set the conviction aside and dismiss the accusation or information against them.This bill would allow a person who has had their conviction set aside and dismissed to petition to have their arrest and related records sealed. Because this bill would result in additional duties on local law enforcement agencies to seal these arrest records, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 243 - Juan Alanis
Child abduction survivors: address confidentiality program.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 243, Alanis. Child abduction survivors: address confidentiality program. Existing law authorizes victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, human trafficking, and elder or dependent adult abuse, and members of their households, to complete an application to be approved by the Secretary of State for the purpose of enabling state and local agencies to respond to requests for public records without disclosing a program participant’s changed name or location, subject to specified conditions. Existing law makes it a misdemeanor for any person to make a false statement in an application. This bill, beginning on July 1, 2024, would make victims of child abduction, as defined, and members of their households eligible for the protections of this address confidentiality program. By expanding the scope of the program to include victims of child abduction and their household members, this bill would impose new duties on local public officials and expand the scope of an existing crime, thereby imposing a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.With regard to any other mandates, this bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs so mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2432 - Eloise Gomez Reyes
Corporations: criminal enhancements.
04/10/2024 - From committee chair, with author's amendments: Amend, and re-refer to Com. on B. & F. Read second time and amended.
AB 2432, as amended, Gabriel. Corporations: criminal enhancements. (1) Existing federal law, the Victims of Crime Act of 1984, creates the Crime Victims Fund and authorizes federal financial assistance to states for the purpose of supporting eligible crime victim assistance programs. Existing law creates various programs under the Office of Emergency Services related to crime prevention and education, including, among other things, programs concerning family violence prevention and domestic violence prevention.This bill would establish the California Crime Victims Fund in the State Treasury.(2) Existing law establishes the aggravated white-collar crime enhancement which imposes enhanced penalties against a person who commits 2 or more related felonies, a material element of which is fraud or embezzlement, that involve a pattern of related felony conduct, and the pattern of related felony conduct involves the taking or loss of more than $100,000, as specified.This bill would authorize a court to impose an additional fine, known as the corporate white collar criminal enhancement, against a corporation that is convicted of a misdemeanor or felony. The bill would authorize the court to determine the amount of the fine, but would set specified limits. The bill would require the court to consider certain factors when determining the amount of the fine, including, among other things, the nature and seriousness of the offense and the corporation’s assets, liabilities, and net worth, as specified. The bill would require that any moneys collected under this provision be deposited into the California Crime Victims Fund.(3) The California Constitution entitles the victim of a crime to restitution. Existing law requires the court in each criminal case to order a convicted defendant to pay full restitution to the victim and a separate restitution fine, as specified.This bill would, if a corporation is convicted of a misdemeanor or felony offense, require the court to impose a separate and additional restitution fine, as specified. The bill would authorize the court to determine the amount of the restitution fine, but would require the fine to meet specified minimums. The bill would require any moneys collected under this provision to be distributed to the California Crime Victims Fund and the prosecuting agency that brought the criminal prosecution, as specified.

CA AB 2452 - Sharon Quirk-Silva
CalWORKs: supportive services.
02/26/2024 - Referred to Com. on HUM. S.
AB 2452, as introduced, Quirk-Silva. CalWORKs: supportive services. Existing law provides for the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program, under which each county provides cash assistance and other benefits to qualified low-income families and individuals. Existing law generally requires a recipient of CalWORKs benefits to participate in welfare-to-work activities as a condition of eligibility for aid. Existing law requires that necessary supportive services be available to participants in welfare-to-work activities, including transportation costs, which are governed by regional market rates as determined in accordance with regulations established by the State Department of Social Services.This bill would instead require mileage costs for welfare-to-work participants to be determined based on the current standard mileage rate for transportation or travel expenses set by the United States Internal Revenue Service. The bill would require a participant in welfare-to-work activities to be issued a monthly advance transportation payment of $100, and would provide for the issuance of supplemental payments for actual costs over $100. By increasing the duties of counties administering the CalWORKs program, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2499 - Pilar Schiavo
Unlawful employment practices: discrimination for time off.
04/10/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on JUD.
AB 2499, as amended, Schiavo. Unlawful employment practices: discrimination for time off. Existing law, subject to specified requirements for the employee, prohibits an employer from discharging or in any manner discriminating against an employee for taking time off to serve on a jury, an employee who is a victim of a crime for taking time off to appear in court as a witness in any judicial proceeding, an employee who is a victim for taking time off from work to obtain or attempt to obtain prescribed relief, or an employee because of the employee’s status as a victim of crime or abuse. Existing law requires an employer to provide reasonable accommodations for a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, who requests an accommodation for the safety of the victim while at work. Existing law requires reinstatement and reimbursement for discrimination or retaliation, as prescribed. Existing law makes an employer’s willful refusal to restore an employee or former employee who has been determined to be eligible for rehiring or promotion by a grievance procedure or hearing authorized by law guilty of a misdemeanor. Existing law authorizes an employee who is discriminated or retaliated against because the employee has exercised these rights to file a complaint with the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement of the Department of Industrial Relations. Existing law defines terms for these purposes.Existing law, subject to specified requirements for the employee, also prohibits an employer with 25 or more employees from discharging, or in any manner discriminating or retaliating against, an employee who is a victim, for taking time off from work to seek medical attention for injuries caused by crime or abuse, to obtain certain services as a result of the crime or abuse or related to an experience of crime or abuse, or to participate in safety planning and take other actions to increase safety from future crime or abuse. Existing law requires reinstatement and reimbursement for discrimination or retaliation, as prescribed. Existing law makes an employer’s willful refusal to restore an employee or former employee who has been determined to be eligible for rehiring or promotion by a grievance procedure or hearing authorized by law guilty of a misdemeanor. Existing law authorizes an employee who is discriminated or retaliated against because the employee has exercised these rights to file a complaint with the division. Existing law defines terms for these purposes.Existing law requires an employer to inform each employee of the victim rights above in writing, to be provided upon hire and to other employees upon request. Existing law requires the Labor Commissioner to develop and post a form that an employer may use to comply, as prescribed.This bill would revise and recast the jury, court, and victim time off provisions for employees as unlawful employment practices within the California Fair Employment and Housing Act and, thus, within the enforcement authority of the Civil Rights Department. The bill would remove the threshold of 25 or more employees from the provisions for victims of crime or abuse and, except as specified, apply its provisions to a person who directly employs one or more persons to perform services for a wage or salary. The bill would refer to a “qualifying act of violence,” as defined, instead of crime, or crime or abuse. The bill would substantially revise existing definitions for its purposes, including defining “victim” as an individual against whom a qualifying act of violence is committed. The bill would prohibit an employer from discharging or in any manner discriminating or retaliating against an employee who is a victim or who has a family member who is a victim for taking time off from work to obtain or attempt to obtain any relief. The bill would prohibit an employer from discharging or in any manner discriminating or retaliating against an employee who is a victim or who has a family member who

CA AB 2523 - Joe Patterson
Needle and syringe exchange services.
04/01/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 2523, as amended, Joe Patterson. Needle and syringe exchange services. Existing law authorizes a clean needle and syringe exchange project in any city, county, or city and county upon the action of a county board of supervisors and the local health officer or health commission of that county, or upon the action of the city council, the mayor, and the local health officer of a city with a health department, or upon the action of the city council and the mayor of a city without a health department. Existing law also authorizes the State Department of Public Health to authorize certain entities to apply to the department to provide hypodermic needle and syringe exchange services in any location where the department determines that the conditions exist for the rapid spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), viral hepatitis, or any other potentially deadly or disabling infections that are spread through the sharing of used hypodermic needles and syringes. Existing law requires the department to authorize the entity after consultation with the local health officer and local law enforcement leadership, and authorizes the department to reauthorize the program in consultation with the local health officer and local law enforcement leadership.This bill would instead authorize a clean needle and syringe exchange project in any city, county, or city and county that chooses to participate. The bill would instead require the department to authorize the entities to apply to the department after the approval from the participating city, county, or city and county, and would instead authorize the department to reauthorize the program with the approval of the participating city, county, or city and county. The bill would prohibit the department from authorizing a clean needle and syringe exchange project without the approval of the city, county, or city and county.Existing law requires the department to, at least 45 days before approval of an entity’s application, provide for a period of public comment and to, among other things, send a written and an email notice to the local health officer of the affected jurisdiction. Existing law requires the department to provide a biennial report to the local health officer based on the reports from service providers that are within the jurisdiction of the local health officer and that are authorized by the department to provide hypodermic needle and syringe exchange services.This bill would instead require the department to send a written and an email notice to the affected city, county, or city and county. The bill would require the department to provide the biennial report to the city, county, or city and county.

CA AB 254 - Laura Friedman
Confidentiality of Medical Information Act: reproductive or sexual health application information.
09/13/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 254, Bauer-Kahan. Confidentiality of Medical Information Act: reproductive or sexual health application information. The Confidentiality of Medical Information Act (CMIA) prohibits a provider of health care, a health care service plan, a contractor, or a corporation and its subsidiaries and affiliates from intentionally sharing, selling, using for marketing, or otherwise using any medical information, as defined, for any purpose not necessary to provide health care services to a patient, except as provided. The CMIA makes a business that offers software or hardware to consumers, including a mobile application or other related device that is designed to maintain medical information in order to make the information available to an individual or a provider of health care at the request of the individual or a provider of health care, for purposes of allowing the individual to manage the individual’s information or for the diagnosis, treatment, or management of a medical condition of the individual, a provider of health care subject to the requirements of the CMIA. Existing law makes a violation of these provisions that results in economic loss or personal injury to a patient punishable as a misdemeanor.This bill would revise the definition of “medical information” to include reproductive or sexual health application information, which the bill would define to mean information about a consumer’s reproductive or sexual health collected by a reproductive or sexual health digital service, as specified. The bill would make a business that offers a reproductive or sexual health digital service to a consumer for the purpose of allowing the individual to manage the individual’s information, or for the diagnosis, treatment, or management of a medical condition of the individual, a provider of health care subject to the requirements of the CMIA. Because the bill would expand the scope of a crime, it would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 56.05 of the Civil Code proposed by AB 1697 to be operative only if this bill and AB 1697 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2581 - Brian K. Maienschein
Healing arts: continuing education: maternal mental health.
04/10/2024 - Read second time and amended.
AB 2581, as amended, Maienschein. Healing arts: continuing education: maternal mental health. Existing law, the Nursing Practice Act, establishes the Board of Registered Nursing and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of the practice of nursing. Existing law, the Psychology Licensing Law, establishes the Board of Psychology and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of psychologists. Existing law, the Physician Assistant Practice Act, establishes the Physician Assistant Board and sets forth its powers and duties relating to the licensure and regulation of physician assistants.Existing law, the Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Act, the Clinical Social Worker Practice Act, the Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor Act, and the Educational Psychologist Practice Act, provides for the licensure and regulation of the practices of marriage and family therapy, clinical social work, professional clinical counseling, and education psychology, respectively, by the Board of Behavioral Sciences.Existing law establishes continuing education requirements for all of these various healing arts practitioners.This bill would require the above-specified boards, in determining their continuing education requirements, to consider including a course in maternal mental health.

CA AB 2621 - Jesse Gabriel
Law enforcement training.
04/08/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2621, as amended, Gabriel. Law enforcement training. Existing law defines a “hate crime” as a criminal act committed, in whole or in part, because of actual or perceived characteristics of the victim, including, among other things, race, religion, disability, and sexual orientation. Existing law requires the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training, in consultation with specified subject-matter experts, to develop a course of instruction that trains law enforcement on, among other things, indicators of hate crimes and techniques, responses to hate crime waves against certain groups, including Arab and Islamic communities, and methods to handle incidents of hate crimes in a noncombative manner.This bill would require instruction to include identifying when a gun violence restraining order is appropriate to prevent a hate crime and the procedure for seeking a gun violence restraining order. The bill would additionally require instruction on responses to hate crime waves against specified groups, including the LGBTQ and Jewish communities.Existing law allows a court to issue a gun violence restraining order prohibiting and enjoining a named person from having custody or control of any firearms or ammunition if the person poses a significant danger of causing personal injury to themselves or another by having custody or control of a firearm or ammunition. Existing law establishes a civil restraining order process to accomplish that purpose, including authorizing the issuance of an ex parte order, as specified.Existing law requires specified law enforcement agencies to develop, adopt, and implement policies and standards relating to gun violence restraining orders. Existing law requires these policies to include, among other things, standards and procedures for requesting and serving an ex parte gun violence restraining order or procedures on the responsibility of officers to attend gun violence restraining order hearings.This bill would revise the above-described policies and standards to include, among other things, an officer’s obligation to diligently participate in the evidence presentation process at hearings and the procedure for storing firearms surrendered in compliance with a gun violence restraining order. The bill would require law enforcement agencies, as specified, to make information about the standards and policies available to all officers. By imposing additional duties on local agencies, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2695 - James C. Ramos
Law enforcement: tribal affiliation.
03/19/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 2695, as amended, Ramos. Law enforcement: tribal affiliation. Existing law requires specified entities and individuals to maintain records required for the correct reporting of statistical data and to report that data to the Department of Justice at the time and in the manner prescribed by the Attorney General. Existing law requires a law enforcement agency to develop an incident report form for recording all domestic violence-related calls for assistance that includes specified data, such as whether weapons are involved or whether there were any signs that the alleged abuser was under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance, among others.This bill would require the above-described entities and individuals to disaggregate that data based on whether the incidents took place in Indian country, as defined, and would require a domestic violence incident report form to include a notation of whether the incident took place in Indian country. By expanding the duties of local law enforcement, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 28 - Anthony J. Portantino Jr.
Firearms and ammunition: excise tax.
09/13/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 28, Gabriel. Firearms and ammunition: excise tax. Existing law establishes the California Violence Intervention and Prevention (CalVIP) Grant Program, administered by the Board of State and Community Corrections, to award competitive grants for the purpose of violence intervention and prevention.Existing law imposes various taxes, including taxes on the privilege of engaging in certain activities. The Fee Collection Procedures Law, the violation of which is a crime, provides procedures for the collection of certain fees and surcharges.This bill, the Gun Violence Prevention and School Safety Act, would, commencing July 1, 2024, impose an excise tax in the amount of 11% of the gross receipts from the retail sale in this state of a firearm, firearm precursor part, and ammunition, as specified. The tax would be collected by the state pursuant to the Fee Collection Procedures Law. The bill would require that the revenues collected be deposited in the Gun Violence Prevention and School Safety Fund, which the bill would establish in the State Treasury. The bill would require the moneys received in the fund to be used to fund various gun violence prevention, education, research, response, and investigation programs, as specified. The bill would require the Director of Finance to transfer, as a loan, $2,400,000 from the General Fund to the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration to implement these provisions, as specified. The bill would require each licensed firearms dealer, firearms manufacturer, and ammunition vendor to register with the department for a certificate, as specified. The bill would also provide procedures for the issuance, revocation, and reinstatement of a permit.This bill would include a change in state statute that would result in a taxpayer paying a higher tax within the meaning of Section 3 of Article XIII?A of the California Constitution, and thus would require for passage the approval of 2/3 of the membership of each house of the Legislature.Because this bill would expand the scope of the Fee Collection Procedures Law, the violation of which is a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2822 - Jesse Gabriel
Domestic violence.
04/03/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on APPR. with recommendation: To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 8. Noes 0.) (April 2). Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
AB 2822, as amended, Gabriel. Domestic violence. Existing law requires every law enforcement agency to develop, adopt, and implement written policies and standards for officers’ responses to domestic violence calls. Existing law requires each law enforcement agency to develop an incident report form the includes, among other things, a notation of whether the officer or officers who responded to the domestic violence call found it necessary, for the protection of the peace officer or other persons present, to inquire of the victim, the alleged abuser, or both, whether a firearm or other deadly weapon was present at the location, and, if there is an inquiry, whether that inquiry disclosed the presence of a firearm or other deadly weapon.This bill would additionally require a law enforcement agency to include in the incident report form a space for officers to document whether a firearm or deadly weapon was removed from the location of the domestic violence call. By increasing the reporting duties on local law enforcement agencies, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2843 - Cottie Petrie-Norris
Health care coverage: rape and sexual assault.
03/04/2024 - Referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 2843, as introduced, Petrie-Norris. Health care coverage: rape and sexual assault. Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law provides for the regulation of health insurers by the Department of Insurance.Existing law requires a victim of sexual assault who seeks a medical evidentiary examination to be provided with one, as specified. Existing law prohibits costs incurred by a qualified health care professional, hospital, clinic, sexual assault forensic examination team, or other emergency medical facility for the medical evidentiary examination portion of the examination of the victim of a sexual assault, as described in a specified protocol, when the examination is performed as specified, from being charged directly or indirectly to the victim of the assault. This bill would require a health care service plan or health insurance policy that is issued, amended, renewed, or delivered on or after January 1, 2025, to provide coverage without cost sharing for emergency room medical care and follow-up health care treatment for an enrollee or insured who is treated following a rape or sexual assault. The bill would prohibit a health care service plan or health insurer from requiring, as a condition of providing coverage, (1) an enrollee or insured to file a police report, (2) charges to be brought against an assailant, (3) or an assailant to be convicted of rape or sexual assault. Because a violation of the bill by a health care service plan would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 2859 - James Norwood Patterson Jr.
Emergency medical technicians: peer support.
03/19/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
AB 2859, as amended, Jim Patterson. Emergency medical technicians: peer support. Existing law establishes a statewide system for emergency medical services (EMS) and establishes the Emergency Medical Services Authority, which is responsible for establishing training, scope of practice, and continuing education for emergency medical technicians and other prehospital personnel.Existing law authorizes a public fire agency or law enforcement agency to establish a peer support and crisis referral program, to provide a network of peer representatives who are available to come to the aid of their fellow employees on a broad range of emotional or professional issues. This bill would authorize an EMS provider to establish a peer support and crisis referral program to provide a network of peer representatives available to aid fellow employees on emotional or professional issues. The bill would provide that EMS personnel, whether or not a party to an action, have a right to refuse to disclose, and to prevent another from disclosing, a confidential communication between the EMS personnel and a peer support team member, crisis hotline, or crisis referral service, except under limited circumstances, including, among others, if disclosure is reasonably believed to be necessary to prevent death, substantial bodily harm, or commission of a crime, or in a criminal proceeding. The bill would also provide that, except for an action for medical malpractice, a peer support team member and the EMS provider that employs them are not liable for damages, as specified, relating to an act, error, or omission in performing peer support services, unless the act, error, or omission constitutes gross negligence or intentional misconduct. To be eligible for these confidentiality protections, the bill would require a peer support team member to complete a training course or courses on peer support approved by the local EMS agency. By imposing a higher level of service on a local agency, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2907 - Rick Chavez Zbur
Firearms: restrained persons.
03/04/2024 - Referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 2907, as introduced, Zbur. Firearms: restrained persons. Existing law provides for the issuance of various temporary restraining orders, restraining orders, and injunctions. Under existing law, persons who are subject to these orders are prohibited from purchasing, owning, or possessing firearms or ammunition. Existing law requires a restrained person who owns or possesses firearms or ammunition to relinquish these items under specified timeframes pursuant to a prescribed procedure.This bill would enact similar restriction and relinquishment procedures for persons who are the subject of specified criminal protective orders issued in domestic violence convictions.This bill would also require the arresting officer in domestic violence cases to question the arrestee, the victim, and other household members about any firearms or ammunition owned or possessed by the arrestee and to query a specified database to find any firearms owned or possessed by the arrestee. The bill would require the officer to document these actions and to provide the information, as specified, to the district attorney or prosecutor.By requiring new duties of local law enforcement officers, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would also require the court, when determining the length of a criminal protective order, to consider this information from the arresting officer.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 2924 - Lori D. Wilson
Marriage: prohibition on minors.
03/04/2024 - Referred to Com. on JUD.
AB 2924, as introduced, Petrie-Norris. Marriage: prohibition on minors. Existing law authorizes an unmarried person who is under 18 years of age to marry upon obtaining a court order granting permission and the written consent of at least one of the parents or the guardian of each underage party to the marriage, as specified. Existing law requires the court, if it considers it necessary, as part of the court order granting permission to marry, to require the parties to the prospective marriage of a minor to participate in premarital counseling, as specified.Existing law provides that 2 unmarried, unrelated adults who have chosen to share one another’s lives in an intimate and committed relationship of mutual caring may establish a domestic partnership by filing a declaration with the Secretary of State, if certain requirements are met. Existing law provides that a person under 18 years of age who, together with the person with whom the person proposes to establish a domestic partnership, meets the requirements for a domestic partnership other than the requirement of being at least 18 years of age, is capable of consenting to and establishing a domestic partnership upon obtaining a court order granting permission to the underage person or persons to establish a domestic partnership. Under existing law, registered domestic partners have the same rights, protections, and benefits as spouses.This bill would repeal the authorization for a person under 18 years of age to be issued a marriage license or to establish a domestic partnership, thereby prohibiting a person under 18 years of age from being issued a marriage license or from establishing a domestic partnership. The bill would make conforming changes.Existing law required the State Registrar to create a document, no later than March 1, 2020, concerning marriage certificates in which one or both of the parties were minors at the time of solemnization of the marriage. Existing law requires the State Registrar to update that document annually, as specified. Existing law requires the local registrar to submit specified information for the purposes of that report.This bill would repeal those provisions.

CA AB 304 - Christopher R. Holden
Domestic violence: probation.
01/03/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto pending.
AB 304, Holden. Domestic violence: probation. Existing law specifies that the terms of probation granted to a person who has been convicted of domestic violence are required to include, among other things, successful completion of a batterer’s program, as defined, or, if such a program is not available, another appropriate counseling program designated by the court, for a period of not less than one year, and a protective order protecting the victim from further acts of violence, threats, stalking, sexual abuse, and harassment. Existing law requires the court to order the defendant to comply with all probation requirements, including the payment of program fees based upon the ability to pay. If the court finds that a defendant does not have the ability to pay the program fee, existing law authorizes the court to reduce or waive the program fee. Existing law requires a batterer’s program to develop and utilize a sliding fee schedule based on a defendant’s ability to pay. The bill would require program providers, as defined, to publicly post, including on an internet website, a comprehensive description of their sliding fee scales. The bill would require the court to inform the defendant of the availability of a program fee waiver, if they do not have the ability to pay for the program, and to provide each defendant with a selection of available program providers and those providers’ standard fees and sliding fee scales before the defendant agrees to the conditions of probation. Existing law requires the probation department, when investigating the appropriate batterer’s program for a defendant, to take into account, among other factors, the defendant’s age, medical history, and educational background. Existing law requires a program to meet certain requirements, including immediately reporting any violation of the terms of the protective order to the court, the prosecutor, and, if formal probation has not been ordered, to the probation department. The bill would require the probation department, when investigating the appropriate program, to also take into account the defendant’s sexual orientation, gender identity, and financial means and to promptly notify each program in which the defendant is required to participate the defendant’s other required, court-mandated programs and probation violations pertaining to a domestic violence offense. The bill would require a program provider to report a violation of the protective order within 7 business days. Existing law requires the court to refer persons to batterer’s programs that have been approved by the probation department. Existing law requires the probation department to design and implement an approval and renewal process for batterer’s programs, to regulate those programs, as specified, and to fix a yearly fee, not to exceed $250 to approve an application or renewal.The bill would place these requirements, instead, in the Department of Justice.The bill, when referencing a batterer’s program, would specifically indicate another appropriate counseling program if a batterer’s program is not available. The bill would, by April 1, 2024, to ensure compliance with state law, make the Department of Justice responsible for collaborating with the Judicial Council and relevant stakeholders to set program provider standards, approving, monitoring, and renewing approvals of program providers, conducting periodic audits of program providers, and developing, in consultation with the Injury and Violence Prevention Branch of the State Department of Public Health, comprehensive statewide standards through regulations, among other responsibilities. The bill would, by April 1, 2024, require the Judicial Council to establish guidelines and training for judges to ensure the consistent adjudication of probation violations.Existing law requires the Judicial Council to establish judicial training programs for individuals who perform duties in domestic violence matters. Existing law requires the tra

CA AB 3072 - Cottie Petrie-Norris
Child custody: ex parte orders.
04/08/2024 - In Senate. Read first time. To Com. on RLS. for assignment.
AB 3072, as amended, Petrie-Norris. Child custody: ex parte orders. Existing law requires the court to refrain from making an order granting or modifying a child custody order on an ex parte basis unless there has been a showing of immediate harm to the child, as defined, or immediate risk that the child will be removed from the State of California.This bill would require a court to consider a parent’s illegal access to firearms and ammunition when determining whether there is a showing of immediate harm to the child, as specified. The bill would also require a court to consider whether the safety and best interest of the child requires the suspension, denial, or limitation of visitation if there is a showing of immediate harm.

CA AB 3083 - Juan Alanis
Domestic violence: protective orders: background checks.
04/04/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on PUB. S.
AB 3083, as amended, Lackey. Domestic violence: protective orders: background checks. The Domestic Violence Prevention Act requires the court, before a hearing on the issuance or denial of a protective order, to ensure that a search of specified records and databases is or has been made to determine if the proposed subject of the order has, among other things, a registered firearm. Existing law limits the implementation of the registered firearm search requirement to courts identified by the Judicial Council as having resources currently available for those purposes. Existing law also limits the implementation of the registered firearm search requirement in other courts to the extent that funds are appropriated for those purposes in the annual Budget Act.This bill would instead require the court to determine if the subject of the proposed order owns or possesses a firearm as reflected in the Department of Justice Automated Firearms System. The bill would repeal the limitation on the firearm search requirement, thereby extending the firearm search requirement to all courts. The bill would make related findings and declarations.

CA AB 310 - Joaquin Arambula
CalWORKs.
06/27/2023 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.
AB 310, as amended, Arambula. CalWORKs. Existing federal law provides for allocation of federal funds through the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant program to eligible states. Existing law establishes the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program, under which, through a combination of state and county funds and federal funds received through the TANF program, each county provides cash assistance and other benefits to qualified low-income families. Existing law imposes various eligibility requirements for the CalWORKs program, including that a child is deprived of parental support or care, a child has received all age-appropriate immunizations, and specified applicants or recipients who are apparently eligible for unemployment insurance shall meet the conditions of eligibility for and accept any unemployment insurance benefits for which they are eligible.This bill would, among other things, repeal the parental deprivation and immunization requirements, and would instead only require that those specified applicants and recipients whom the county has evidence that they are eligible for unemployment insurance to apply for, but not meet the conditions of, unemployment insurance benefits. By expanding eligibility for the CalWORKs program, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law generally requires a recipient of CalWORKs benefits to participate in welfare-to-work activities as a condition of eligibility for aid, except if they are exempt or excused from participation for good cause. Existing law requires a participant to enter into a written welfare-to-work plan with the county, and specifies the work activities that may be included in a participant’s plan, including mental health, substance abuse, and domestic violence services that are necessary to obtain and retain employment. Existing law also requires participants to participate in job search activities for a period of up to 4 consecutive weeks, as specified. This bill would, among other things, revise and recast the welfare-to-work program, by renaming it as the family assistance program, repealing the provision that makes participation in work activities a condition of eligibility for CalWORKs aid, and instead requiring that every recipient be provided with an opportunity to participate in family assistance activities. The bill would expand the list of work activities by including home visiting services and financial literacy classes and coaching that are necessary to obtain and retain employment or improve family or financial well-being, activities that develop and enhance workplace skills, and activities that build foundations for employment, as specified. The bill would repeal the job search requirements. The bill would require a county to provide the participant with a plan form within 60 days after the date that a participant’s eligibility for aid is determined or the date the participant chooses to participate in work activities wherein the recipient may select the activities and the number of hours they want to participate in, including any and all available support services. By increasing the duties of counties administering the CalWORKs program, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Under existing law, when an individual fails or refuses to comply with specified components of the CalWORKs program without good cause, and conciliation efforts have failed, the individual is subject to a financial sanction that requires the family’s grant to be reduced by removing the noncomplying family member from the assistance unit. Existing law prohibits sanctions from being applied for a failure or refusal to comply with program requirements if, among other reasons, the employment, offer of employment, activity, or other training, or for employment discriminates on specified bases or involves conditions that are in violation of applicable health and safety standards, among other

CA AB 311 - Melissa Hurtado
California Food Assistance Program: eligibility and benefits.
06/15/2023 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Hearing canceled at the request of author.
AB 311, as introduced, Santiago. California Food Assistance Program: eligibility and benefits. Existing federal law provides for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), known in California as CalFresh, under which supplemental nutrition assistance benefits allocated to the state by the federal government are distributed to eligible individuals by each county.Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services to establish a food assistance program, known as the California Food Assistance Program (CFAP), to provide assistance to a noncitizen of the United States if the person’s immigration status meets the eligibility criteria of SNAP in effect on August 21, 1996, but the person is not eligible for SNAP benefits solely due to their immigration status, as specified. Existing law also makes eligible for the program an applicant who is otherwise eligible for the program, but who entered the United States on or after August 22, 1996, if the applicant is sponsored and the applicant meets one of a list of criteria, including that the applicant, after entry into the United States, is a victim of the sponsor or the spouse of the sponsor if the spouse is living with the sponsor.Existing law, to become operative on the date that the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System (SAWS) has been updated to perform the necessary automation, and subject to an appropriation in the annual Budget Act, makes an individual 55 years of age or older eligible for the program if the individual’s immigration status is the sole basis for their ineligibility for CalFresh benefits.This bill would remove that age limitation and make any individual eligible for the program if the individual’s immigration status is the sole basis for their ineligibility for CalFresh benefits. By extending eligibility for CFAP, which is administered by the counties, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 3127 - Tina McKinnor
Reporting of crimes: mandated reporters.
04/11/2024 - Read second time. Ordered to third reading.
AB 3127, as amended, McKinnor. Reporting of crimes: mandated reporters. Existing law requires a health practitioner, as defined, to make a report to law enforcement when they suspect a patient has suffered physical injury that is either self-inflicted, caused by a firearm, or caused by assaultive or abusive conduct, including elder abuse, sexual assault, or torture. A violation of these provisions is punishable as a misdemeanor.This bill would remove the requirement that a health practitioner make a report to law enforcement when they suspect a patient has suffered physical injury caused by assaultive or abusive conduct. The bill would instead require that a health practitioner make a report when the injury is life threatening or results in death, as specified, or is the result of child abuse or elder or dependent adult abuse. The bill would require the health practitioner to additionally make a report when a person is seeking care for injuries related to domestic, sexual, or any nonaccidental violent injury if the patient requests a report be sent, as specified.The bill would also require a health practitioner who suspects that a patient has suffered physical injury that is caused by domestic violence, as defined, to provide brief counseling and a referral to local and national domestic violence or sexual violence advocacy services, as specified.This bill would make other conforming changes.Because a violation of these requirements would be a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 3139 - Akilah Weber
Data privacy: vehicle manufacturers: remote vehicle technology.
04/01/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on P. & C.P.
AB 3139, as amended, Weber. Data privacy: vehicle manufacturers: remote vehicle technology. Existing law establishes various privacy requirements applicable to vehicle manufacturers, including limitations on the usage of images or video recordings from in-vehicle cameras in new motor vehicles equipped standard with one or more in-vehicle cameras. Existing law provides various protections to persons who are escaping from actual or threatened domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, human trafficking, and other abuse, including providing for a means to keep the names and addresses of abuse survivors confidential in public records.This bill would require a vehicle manufacturer, no later than 2 business days after receiving a completed vehicle separation request from a survivor, to separate the perpetrator’s access to the remote vehicle technology from the vehicle subject to specified requirements, including that the vehicle manufacturer performs the separation without imposing any fee. If the vehicle manufacturer cannot operationally or technically separate a perpetrator’s access to the remote vehicle technology from the vehicle, the bill would require a vehicle manufacturer to separate the remote vehicle technology from the vehicle subject to the above-described requirements. The bill would require a vehicle manufacturer to offer secure remote means via the internet for a survivor to submit a vehicle separation request that meets specified requirements, and would require the vehicle manufacturer to receive a vehicle separation request through those means.The bill would require a vehicle separation request submitted to a vehicle manufacturer to include prescribed information, including a statement by the survivor signed under penalty of perjury that a perpetrator who has access to the remote vehicle technology in the vehicle has committed or allegedly committed a covered act against the survivor or an individual in the survivor’s care, or a copy of specified documents that support that the perpetrator has committed or allegedly committed a covered act against the survivor or an individual in the survivor’s care, including a signed affidavit from, among other specified individuals acting within the scope of their employment, a licensed medical care provider.By requiring a survivor to submit a statement signed under penalty of perjury or requiring specified individuals to sign an affidavit, the bill would expand the crime of perjury and impose a state-mandated local program.The bill would require a vehicle manufacturer to notify a survivor that submits a vehicle separation request, as specified, that the vehicle manufacturer may contact the survivor, or a designated representative of the survivor, to confirm the request. The bill would require a vehicle manufacturer, if the vehicle manufacturer cannot operationally or technically effectuate a vehicle separation request, to perform specified duties, including notifying the survivor who submitted the vehicle separation request of the vehicle manufacturer’s inability to effectuate a vehicle separation request, as specified.The bill would make a vehicle manufacturer that violates the above-described provisions liable in a civil action brought by a survivor for, among other things, reasonable attorney’s fees and costs of the prevailing survivor, in addition to any other remedy provided by law. The bill would specify that any waiver of the requirements of the above-described provisions is against public policy, void, and unenforceable.The bill would define various terms for these purposes, and would make related findings and declarations.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 3195 - Scott D. Wiener
Alcoholic beverages: hours of sale.
03/11/2024 - Referred to Com. on G.O.
AB 3195, as introduced, Haney. Alcoholic beverages: hours of sale. Existing law, the Alcoholic Beverage Control Act, which is administered by the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, regulates the application for, and the issuance and suspension of, alcoholic beverage licenses. Existing law requires moneys collected as fees pursuant to the act to be deposited in the Alcohol Beverage Control Fund, with those moneys generally allocated to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control upon appropriation by the Legislature. Existing law makes it a misdemeanor for any on- or off-sale licensee, or agent or employee of the licensee, to sell, give, or deliver to any person any alcoholic beverage between the hours of 2 a.m. and 6 a.m. of the same day, and for any person who knowingly purchases any alcoholic beverages between those hours.This bill, beginning January 1, 2025, would allow an on-sale licensee, or their agent or employee, to sell or give alcoholic beverages until 4 a.m. on Fridays, Saturdays, and certain holidays if the licensee holds an additional serving hours license that the bill would create, as specified. The bill, beginning January 1, 2025, would authorize the department to issue an additional serving hours license if the local governing body of the city in which the licensed premises is located adopts an ordinance that meets certain requirements, as specified. Among those requirements are that the ordinance identify the additional serving hours area in which an on-sale licensed premises would be eligible for an additional serving hours license, include assessments of the impact of an additional hours service area, and show that the local law enforcement budget will be increased by at least 5% to mitigate public safety and transportation impacts.This bill would require an applicant for an additional hours license to pay a $2,500 fee at the time of application and specify that the fee for an original and annual additional hours license is $2,500; these fees would be deposited into the Alcohol Beverage Control Fund. The bill would prohibit an on-sale licensee from exercising off-sale privileges during the additional serving hours permitted pursuant to an additional serving hours license and specify that an additional serving hours license is not transferrable between on-sale licensed premises. The bill would authorize a local governing body to charge an additional serving hours licensee a fee to fund local law enforcement.This bill would require the department, upon receipt of an application by an on-sale licensee for an additional serving hours license, to make a thorough investigation. The bill would require the applicant to notify law enforcement and residents, who may then file with the department protests and requests for a hearing, as specified. The bill would make it a misdemeanor for any person under 21 years of age to enter and remain in licensed premises during the additional service hours period without lawful business therein punishable by a fine of not less than $200. By creating a new crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would require the department to adopt rules and regulations to enforce these provisions. The bill would require a city that by ordinance creates an additional serving hours area to provide the Legislature an annual report on its impact, as specified.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 325 - Eloise Gomez Reyes
Human services: noncitizen victims.
09/01/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 325, as introduced, Reyes. Human services: noncitizen victims. Under existing law, noncitizen victims of trafficking, domestic violence, and other serious crimes, as defined, are eligible for certain public social services and health care services to the same extent as individuals who are admitted to the United States as refugees. Existing law requires that those services discontinue if there is a final administrative denial of a visa application, as specified. Existing law requires that benefits and services under those provisions be paid from state funds to the extent federal funding is unavailable.This bill would prohibit the discontinuance of those services due to the denial of a visa application if the individual is eligible for those services on another basis. The bill would also expand those services to noncitizen victims of parental maltreatment, noncitizen children who have been abused, neglected, or abandoned, and noncitizens who fear persecution. The bill would add to the categories of eligible noncitizen victims for the services individuals who have filed a formal application or petition with the appropriate federal agency for status or relief under the federal Violence Against Women Act, for special immigrant juvenile status, for asylum status, or for parole as family members of victims of severe trafficking, as specified. The bill would also make nonsubstantive conforming changes. By increasing duties for counties to administer and determine eligibility for public social services and health care services, the bill would create a state-mandated local program.The bill would require the Director of Social Services to adopt regulations, which may be emergency regulations, to implement these provisions no later than July 1, 2024. The bill would authorize the State Department of Social Services to implement and administer these provisions through an all-county letter or similar instructions from the director until regulations are adopted.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 330 - Thomas W. Lackey
Domestic violence: victim’s information card.
05/18/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 330, as amended, Dixon. Domestic violence: victim’s information card. Existing law directs the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training to establish training and guidelines for law enforcement officers, as defined, in the handling of domestic violence complaints, such as how to respond to domestic violence incidents, the legal duties imposed on law enforcement officers to make arrests and offer assistance, and techniques to promote the safety of the victim, as specified. Existing law requires law enforcement agencies to develop and implement written policies for officer responses to domestic violence incidents, including furnishing written notice to victims at the scene in the form of a Victims of Domestic Violence card that contains, among other information, telephone numbers for local hotlines, shelters, and counseling centers.This bill would add the issuance of Victims of Domestic Violence cards as a topic in the course of instruction for the training of law enforcement officers. This bill would additionally require the Victims of Domestic Violence card to be a different color than other cards issued by officers, to include a disclaimer, to be available in languages other than English, and to include various information such as the definition of domestic violence and the statute of limitations for domestic violence. This bill would make these changes operative on January 1, 2025. Because this bill would expand an existing local program, it would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law establishes the Office of Emergency Services and makes it responsible for providing assistance such as financial, technical, and educational support, as specified, on the topic of domestic violence to local entities including domestic violence support centers and law enforcement.This bill, commencing January 1, 2025, would require the office to develop a model Victims of Domestic Violence card that can be modified by cities and counties. The bill would also require the office to publish on an internet website maintained by the office specified information and resources to assist victims of domestic violence, including, among other things, a summary of state mandatory arrest policies for domestic violence crimes.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 36 - Jesse Gabriel
Domestic violence protective orders: possession of a firearm.
05/18/2023 - In committee: Held under submission.
AB 36, as amended, Gabriel. Domestic violence protective orders: possession of a firearm. (1) Existing law prohibits a person subject to a protective order, as defined, from owning, possessing, purchasing, or receiving a firearm or ammunition while that protective order is in effect. Existing law makes a violation of that prohibition with regard to purchasing or receiving a firearm or ammunition punishable by imprisonment in the county jail for up to one year, by imprisonment in the state prison for 16 months or 2 or 3 years, or by a fine not exceeding $1,000, or by both that imprisonment and fine. Existing law makes a violation of that prohibition with regard to owning or possessing a firearm or ammunition punishable by imprisonment in the county jail for up to one year, or by a fine not exceeding $1,000, or by both that imprisonment and fine.After notice and hearing, this bill would, for protective orders, as specified, issued on or after July 1, 2024, prohibit a person subject to the protective order from owning, possessing, purchasing, or receiving a firearm or ammunition within 3 years after the expiration of the order and make a violation of these provision a crime. The bill would require a court, if they find that the person willfully violated that prohibition within 3 years after the expiration of the order, to impose the maximum fine allowed under existing law. (2) Existing law allows a search warrant to be issued upon various grounds, including when the property or things to be seized include a firearm, if the prohibited firearm is possessed, owned, in the custody of, or controlled by a person against whom a specified protective order has been issued, and the person is served with the order and fails to relinquish the firearm as required by law.This bill would expand the grounds for the search warrant to include a person who is subject to any civil or criminal protective order that includes a prohibition on owning, possessing, or having custody or control of a firearm.(3) Existing law requires the Judicial Council to provide notice on all protective orders issued within the state and requires a restraining order requiring a person to relinquish a firearm or ammunition to state on its face that the respondent is prohibited from owning, possessing, purchasing, or receiving a firearm or ammunition while the protective order is in effect.This bill would require the Judicial Council to also include a statement in the notice that the firearm and ammunition prohibition extends for 3 years after the expiration of the protective order that is issued on or after July 1, 2024. The bill would require a restraining order to include a similar statement.By creating new crimes, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA AB 365 - Cecilia M. Aguiar-Curry
Medi-Cal: diabetes management.
09/12/2023 - Ordered to inactive file at the request of Senator Limón.
AB 365, as amended, Aguiar-Curry. Medi-Cal: diabetes management. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Existing law sets forth a schedule of benefits under the Medi-Cal program. This bill would add continuous glucose monitors and related supplies required for use with those monitors as a covered benefit under the Medi-Cal program for the treatment of diabetes when medically necessary, subject to utilization controls. The bill would require the department, by July 1, 2024, to review, and update as appropriate, coverage policies for continuous glucose monitors, as specified. The bill would authorize the department to require a manufacturer of a continuous glucose monitor to enter into a rebate agreement with the department. The bill would limit its implementation to the extent that any necessary federal approvals are obtained and federal financial participation is available. The bill would make related findings and declarations.

CA AB 425 - David Alvarez
Medi-Cal: pharmacogenomic testing.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 425, Alvarez. Medi-Cal: pharmacogenomic testing. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Existing law sets forth a schedule of covered benefits under the Medi-Cal program.This bill would, commencing on July 1, 2024, add pharmacogenomic testing as a covered benefit under Medi-Cal, as specified. The bill would define pharmacogenomic testing as laboratory genetic testing that includes, but is not limited to, a panel test, to identify how a person’s genetics may impact the efficacy, toxicity, and safety of medications.The bill would condition implementation of this benefit coverage on receipt of any necessary federal approvals and the availability of federal financial participation. The bill would authorize the department to implement these provisions through all-county letters or similar instructions.The bill would also make related legislative findings.

CA AB 435 - Sabrina Cervantes
Public social services: automated application process.
02/01/2024 - From committee: Filed with the Chief Clerk pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
AB 435, as amended, Cervantes. Public social services: automated application process. Existing law requires the Office of Systems Integration within the California Health and Human Services Agency to implement a statewide automated welfare system, known as the California Statewide Automated Welfare System (CalSAWS), for various public assistance programs, including the CalWORKs program, CalFresh, and the Medi-Cal program. Under existing law, among other duties, the state is consolidating existing consortia systems into the single CalSAWS.Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services to establish and supervise the Cash Assistance Program for Aged, Blind, and Disabled Legal Immigrants (CAPI), which provides cash assistance to aged, blind, and disabled legal immigrants who are not citizens of the United States, as specified. Existing law establishes the state-funded Trafficking and Crime Victim Assistance Program (TCVAP), which provides critical benefits and services to noncitizen victims of human trafficking, domestic violence, and other serious crimes. Existing law also requires the department, after setting aside state administrative funds, to allocate social services funds derived from appropriated federal funds and federally targeted assistance to eligible counties. Existing law requires these funds, known as Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA), to be used by the county, pursuant to a plan developed by the county, to provide services to refugees that lead to successful self-sufficiency and social integration for the refugees.This bill would require CalSAWS to accept and process applications for CAPI, TCVAP, and RCA. The bill would require a county social services department to post on its internet website general information identifying available immigrant benefit services, including, but not limited to, those programs. By increasing the duties of county human services departments, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would require the State Department of Social Services, with 60 days of the effective date of the bill, to report to the budget committees and relevant policy committees of the Legislature the department’s plan to ensure that potential beneficiaries are able to apply online for those programs by December 1, 2024, or when the department notifies the Legislature that CalSAWS can perform the necessary automation to implement it, as specified. The bill would require the department to implement the bill’s requirements by all-county letters or similar instructions, beginning no later than March 1, 2024, or when the department notifies the Legislature that CalSAWS can perform the necessary automation to implement it, until regulations are adopted. The bill also would make findings and declarations relating to CalSAWS automation activities.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 459 - Matt Haney
Contracts against public policy: personal or professional services: digital replicas.
09/14/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on RLS.
AB 459, as amended,  Kalra. Contracts against public policy: personal or professional services: digital replicas. Existing law prohibits an employer from requiring an employee or applicant for employment to agree, in writing, to any term or condition that is known by the employer to be illegal. Existing law provides that certain contractual agreements between an employer and employee are against public policy, including specified provisions affecting an employee’s membership in a labor organization and the protection of state law in employment. Under existing law, enforcement of state labor laws is generally committed to the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement within the Department of Industrial Relations, under the direction of the Labor Commissioner.This bill would provide that a provision in an agreement between an individual and any other person for the performance of personal or professional services is contrary to public policy and deemed unconscionable if the provision meets specified conditions relating to the use of a digital replica of the voice or likeness of an individual in lieu of the work of the individual or to train a generative artificial intelligence system. The bill would provide that it shall apply retroactively. The bill would require any person who is currently under, or has entered into, an agreement with an individual performing personal or professional services containing such a provision, by February 1, 2024, to notify that individual in writing that the provision is unenforceable.

CA AB 467 - Jesse Gabriel
Domestic violence: restraining orders.
06/29/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 14, Statutes of 2023.
AB 467, Gabriel. Domestic violence: restraining orders. Existing law allows the court to issue a protective order restraining a defendant from any contact with the victim if the defendant has been convicted of a crime of domestic violence, human trafficking, a crime in furtherance of a criminal street gang, or a registerable sex offense. Under existing law, the protective order may be valid for up to 10 years, as determined by the court.This bill would clarify that the order may be modified by the sentencing court in the county in which it was issued throughout the duration of the order.

CA AB 479 - Blanca E. Rubio
Alternative domestic violence program.
07/11/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3 p.m.
AB 479, Blanca Rubio. Alternative domestic violence program. Existing law requires that the terms of probation granted to a person who has been convicted of domestic violence include, among other things, successful completion of a batterer’s program or, if a batterer’s program is not available, another appropriate counseling program. Existing law requires a batterer’s program to be approved by the probation department and specifies the standards for approving batterer’s programs. Existing law, until July 1, 2023, authorizes the Counties of Napa, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, and Yolo to offer an alternative program for individuals convicted of domestic violence.This bill would extend these provisions until July 1, 2026.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as an urgency statute.

CA AB 719 - Tasha Boerner
Medi-Cal: nonmedical and nonemergency medical transportation.
01/25/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 719, Boerner. Medi-Cal: nonmedical and nonemergency medical transportation. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Existing law establishes a schedule of benefits under the Medi-Cal program, including medical transportation and nonmedical transportation for a beneficiary to obtain covered Medi-Cal services. Existing law requires nonmedical transportation to be provided by the beneficiary’s managed care plan or by the department for a Medi-Cal fee-for-service beneficiary.This bill would require the department to require Medi-Cal managed care plans that are contracted to provide nonmedical transportation or nonemergency medical transportation to contract with public paratransit service operators who are enrolled Medi-Cal providers for the purpose of establishing reimbursement rates for nonmedical and nonemergency medical transportation trips provided by a public paratransit service operator. The bill would require the rates reimbursed by the managed care plan to the public paratransit service operator to be based on the department’s fee-for-service rates for nonmedical and nonemergency medical transportation service, as specified. The bill would condition implementation of these provisions on receipt of any necessary federal approvals and the availability of federal financial participation.

CA AB 732 - Mike Fong
Crimes: relinquishment of firearms.
09/13/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 732, as amended, Mike Fong. Crimes: relinquishment of firearms. Existing law prohibits a person who has been convicted of a felony or of specified misdemeanors from owning, purchasing, receiving, or possessing a firearm for specified periods of time. Existing law, as enacted by the Safety for All Act of 2016, an initiative statute approved by voters as Proposition 63 at the November 8, 2016, statewide general election, requires any defendant subject to this prohibition to relinquish any firearm that they own or possess within 5 days of conviction if not in custody after a conviction, as specified, and provides a procedure for the verification and enforcement of this requirement. Existing law also requires that, if the defendant is in custody following a conviction, the defendant must relinquish any firearms within 14 days, as specified. Existing law also authorizes the court to shorten or enlarge the time period for relinquishment of a firearm with good cause.Proposition 63 allows its provisions to be amended by a vote of 55% of the Legislature so long as the amendments are consistent with, and further the intent of, the act.This bill would amend Proposition 63 by requiring a defendant not in custody to relinquish their firearms within 48 hours.Existing law requires a court to assign a probation officer when a defendant is convicted of a crime that would prohibit them from owning, purchasing, receiving, or possessing a firearm. Existing law requires the assigned probation officer to, prior to the final disposition or sentencing in the case, report to the court whether the defendant complied with the requirement to relinquish their firearms and file the proper paperwork providing proof of relinquishment. Existing law also requires that the court make findings on whether the probation officer’s report indicates compliance by the defendant. If the court finds probable cause that the defendant failed to relinquish their firearms, existing law authorizes the court to order for the search and removal of any firearms at any location where the judge has probable cause to believe the firearms are located.This bill would require the probation officer to also provide their report on defendant compliance to the prosecuting attorney. The bill would also require the court, after a warrant request has been submitted, to order a search warrant for the search and removal of any firearms if the court finds probable cause that the defendant failed to relinquish their firearms, as specified, or to extend the time for providing proof of relinquishment to 14 days for good cause. The bill would further require the court to refer the matter to the prosecuting attorney and set a status review within 14 days if it finds that additional investigation is needed. By placing additional requirements on county probation officers, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law requires a law enforcement agency to retain a firearm relinquished by a defendant after a conviction of an offense that would prohibit them from owning a firearm for 30 days. Once the 30-day period expires, existing law authorizes the agency to destroy, retain, sell, or transfer the firearm, except as specified.This bill would remove the authorization for the law enforcement agency to sell the relinquished firearm.Existing law requires the Attorney General to establish and maintain an online database known as the Prohibited Armed Persons File, also referred to as the Armed Prohibited Persons System (APPS), to cross-reference persons who have ownership or possession of a firearm and who, subsequent to the date of that ownership or possession of a firearm, fall within a class of persons who are prohibited from owning or possessing a firearm. Existing law requires the Attorney General to keep and properly file a complete record of, among other things, copies of fingerprints, copies of licenses to carry firearms, as specified, and dealers’ records of firearms sales.Th

CA AB 751 - Pilar Schiavo
Elder abuse.
06/29/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State - Chapter 18, Statutes of 2023.
AB 751, Schiavo. Elder abuse. Existing law requires every local law enforcement agency to, when the agency next undertakes the policy revision process, revise or include specified information about the elements of elder abuse crimes in the portion of its policy manual relating to elder and dependent adult abuse, if that policy manual exists. Existing law requires a municipal police department or county sheriffs’ department that adopts or revises a policy regarding elder and dependent adult abuse or senior and disability victimization on or after April 13, 2021, to include specified provisions regarding procedures for investigating elder abuse in that policy. This bill would clarify that a department that complied or complies with the requirements above regarding including specified information about the elements of elder abuse crimes in their policy manuals on or after April 13, 2021, is required to include the specified provisions regarding procedures for investigating elder abuse in their policy.

CA AB 789 - Sabrina Cervantes
Student financial aid: Cal Grants: satisfactory academic progress.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 3:30 p.m.
AB 789, Berman. Student financial aid: Cal Grants: satisfactory academic progress. Existing law, the Cal Grant Program, establishes the Cal Grant A and B Entitlement Awards, the California Community College Expanded Entitlement Awards, the California Community College Transfer Entitlement Awards, the Competitive Cal Grant A and B Awards, the Cal Grant C Awards, and the Cal Grant T Awards under the administration of the Student Aid Commission. Existing law establishes eligibility requirements for awards under these programs for participating students attending qualifying institutions. For a student to qualify for a Cal Grant award, existing law requires that the student, among other things, make satisfactory academic progress at a qualifying institution. Existing law defines “satisfactory academic progress” as those criteria required by applicable federal standards published in Title 34 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Existing law authorizes the commission to adopt regulations defining “satisfactory academic progress” in a manner that is consistent with the federal standards.This bill would require, as part of the criteria to be a qualifying institution under the Cal Grant Program, an institution, by the start of the 2024–25 academic year, to comply with various requirements regarding “satisfactory academic progress” standards used to determine if a student qualifies for a Cal Grant and to develop and implement policies defining “satisfactory academic progress” in a manner that is consistent with the federal standards. The bill would delete the commission’s authorization to adopt regulations defining “satisfactory academic progress.”

CA AB 818 - Cottie Petrie-Norris
Protective orders.
09/13/2023 - Senate amendments concurred in. To Engrossing and Enrolling.
AB 818, as amended, Petrie-Norris. Protective orders. Existing law provides for temporary restraining orders or emergency protective orders with respect to domestic violence and elder abuse, as specified. Existing law requires that a temporary restraining order or emergency protective order issued under these provisions be served on the respondent at the request of the petitioner, whether or not the respondent has been taken into custody, by a law enforcement officer who is present at the scene of reported domestic violence involving the parties to the proceeding.This bill would expand these provisions to require service of orders issued after hearing. The bill would also authorize these orders to be served by a law enforcement officer who receives a request from the petitioner to provide service of the order, but would exclude service by specified peace officers, including a parole officer of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation or a probation officer. The bill would prohibit a fee from being charged to the petitioner for service of those orders. The bill would require specified peace officers to take into temporary custody any firearm or deadly weapon in plain sight or discovered pursuant to a consensual or otherwise lawful search for the protection of peace officers or other persons present when those officers are at the scene of a domestic violence incident involving a threat to human life or physical assault, serving a protective order pursuant to the above provisions, or serving a gun violence restraining order. By expanding the duties of local law enforcement, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law requires a law enforcement agency to enter all firearms that have been reported stolen, lost, found, recovered, held for safekeeping, or under observation into the Automated Firearms System (AFS).This bill would require law enforcement to enter, or cause to be entered, a firearm into the AFS if the firearm is obtained at the scene of a domestic violence incident or during service of specified orders.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA AB 957 - Scott D. Wiener
Family law: gender identity.
01/29/2024 - Consideration of Governor's veto stricken from file.
AB 957, Wilson. Family law: gender identity. Existing law governs the determination of child custody and visitation in contested proceedings and requires the court, for purposes of deciding custody, to determine the best interests of the child based on certain factors, including, among other things, the health, safety, and welfare of the child.This bill, for purposes of this provision, would include a parent’s affirmation of the child’s gender identity or gender expression as part of the health, safety, and welfare of the child.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 3011 of the Family Code proposed by SB 599 to be operative only if this bill and SB 599 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.

CA SB 100 - Nancy Skinner
Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022.
05/08/2023 - Re-referred to Com. on BUDGET pursuant to Assembly Rule 97.
SB 100, as amended,  Skinner. Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022. The Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years.This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 by amending and adding items of appropriation and making other changes.The bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA SB 1000 - Susan Rubio
Connected devices: access: abusers.
04/10/2024 - Set for hearing April 23.
SB 1000, as amended, Ashby. Connected devices: access: abusers. Existing law authorizes a court to issue a restraining order to a person to prevent abuse, as specified, based on reasonable proof of a past act or acts of abuse. Existing law authorizes the order to be issued solely on the affidavit or testimony of the person requesting the restraining order.Existing law requires a manufacturer of a connected device to equip the device with a reasonable security feature or features that are appropriate to the nature and function of the device, appropriate to the information it may collect, contain, or transmit, and designed to protect the device and information contained in the device from unauthorized access, destruction, use, modification, or disclosure.This bill would, commencing January 1, 2026, require an account manager, as defined, to deny an abuser, as defined, access to a connected device commencing no later than 2 days after a device protection request is submitted to the account manager by a victim of that abuser, and would set forth the requirements for a victim to submit a device protection request and the requirements that an account manager make the request available. By providing that a victim may include a copy of a signed affidavit to submit a device protection request, and thus expanding the crime of perjury, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would require the account manager to notify the victim of specified information and require an account manager and any officer, director, employee, vendor, or agent thereof to treat any information submitted by a victim as confidential and securely dispose of the information, as provided.This bill would authorize enforcement of these provisions by injunction or civil penalty in any court action by any person injured by a violation of those provisions, the Attorney General, or a district attorney, against an account manager or abuser, as provided. The bill would prohibit a waiver of these prohibitions and would declare that these provisions are severable.Existing law authorizes a court to issue an ex parte order for, among other things, disturbing the peace of the other party. Existing law provides that disturbing the peace of the other party may be committed directly or indirectly, including through the use of a third party, and by any method or through any means including, but not limited to, telephone, online accounts, text messages, internet-connected devices, or other electronic technologies.This bill would provide that, for purposes of those provisions, an internet-connected device includes a connected device as described in the bill.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA SB 101 - Nancy Skinner
Budget Act of 2023.
06/15/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 11:20 a.m.
SB 101, Skinner. Budget Act of 2023. This bill would make appropriations for the support of state government for the 2023–24 fiscal year.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA SB 102 - Nancy Skinner
Budget Act of 2023.
06/26/2023 - Ordered to third reading.
SB 102, as amended,  Skinner. Budget Act of 2023. The Budget Act of 2023 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2023–24 fiscal year.This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2023 by amending, adding, and repealing items of appropriation and making other changes.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA SB 103 - Nancy Skinner
Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022.
06/26/2023 - Ordered to third reading.
SB 103, as amended,  Skinner. Budget Acts of 2021 and 2022. The Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years. This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2021 and Budget Act of 2022 by amending and adding items of appropriation and making other changes. The bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA SB 104 - Nancy Skinner
Budget Acts of 2022 and 2023.
09/13/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 189, Statutes of 2023.
SB 104, Skinner. Budget Acts of 2022 and 2023. The Budget Act of 2022 and the Budget Act of 2023 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2022–23 and 2023–24 fiscal years.This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2022 and the Budget Act of 2023 by amending and adding items of appropriation and making other changes.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA SB 1051 - Susan Talamantes Eggman
Victims of abuse or violence: lock changes.
04/11/2024 - From committee with author's amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on JUD.
SB 1051, as amended, Eggman. Victims of abuse or violence: lock changes. Existing law requires a landlord to change the locks of a protected tenant’s dwelling unit upon the protected tenant’s written request not later than 24 hours after the protected tenant gives the landlord a copy of a court order or police report that restrains a person who is not a tenant of the same dwelling unit as the protected tenant from contact with the protected tenant. Existing law permits the protected tenant to change the locks if the landlord fails to do so within 24 hours, as provided. For these purposes, existing law defines “protected tenant” as a tenant who has obtained a court order, as defined, or a police report showing that the tenant or the tenant’s household member is a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking, as specified.This bill would repeal, recast, and revise these provisions to apply when a person is alleged to have committed abuse or violence against an eligible tenant or the immediate family or household member of an eligible tenant, and the person is not a tenant of the same dwelling unit as the eligible tenant. The bill would define “eligible tenant” for these purposes as either a tenant who is a victim of abuse or violence, as defined, or a tenant whose immediate family member or household member is a victim of abuse or violence. The bill would require a landlord to, at the landlord’s expense and upon the eligible tenant’s written request, change the locks of an eligible tenant’s dwelling unit not later than 24 hours after the eligible tenant gives the landlord specified documentation. The bill would require an eligible tenant’s written request to include one of the following forms of documentation, of the tenant’s choosing: (1) a copy of a temporary restraining order, emergency protective order, or protective order, as specified; (2) a copy of a written report by a peace officer; (3) specified documentation from a qualified third party, as defined, showing that the tenant, their household member, or their immediate family member is seeking assistance for physical or mental injuries resulting from an act of abuse or violence; or (4) any other form of documentation that reasonably verifies the abuse or violence, as specified. The bill would require a landlord to reimburse the eligible tenant for expenses the tenant incurred if the eligible tenant changes the locks.Existing law, if a tenant is restrained under a court order from contact with a protected tenant, as defined, of the same dwelling unit, requires a landlord to change the locks of a protected tenant’s dwelling unit upon the protected tenant’s written request not later than 24 hours after the protected tenant gives the landlord a copy of the court order.This bill would additionally require the landlord to reimburse the protected tenant for expenses the tenant incurred in changing the locks if the landlord fails to change the locks within 24 hours of the tenant providing a written request to the landlord. The bill would make other nonsubstantive changes.This bill would also prohibit a landlord or landlord’s agent from making an adverse action, as defined, based on, among other things, the prospective tenant having previously requested to have their locks changed due to abuse or violence pursuant to the above-described provisions or the prospective tenant, or an immediate family member or household member of the prospective tenant, has been a victim of abuse or violence. The bill would provide that a landlord or landlord’s agent who violates this prohibition is liable to the prospective or current tenant in a civil action for actual damages and statutory damages of not less than $100 and not more than $5,000.

CA SB 106 - Scott D. Wiener
Budget Acts of 2022 and 2023.
04/08/2024 - Ordered to second reading.
SB 106, as amended,  Wiener. Budget Acts of 2022 and 2023. The Budget Act of 2022 and the Budget Act of 2023 made appropriations for the support of state government for the 2022–23 and 2023–24 fiscal years.This bill would amend the Budget Act of 2022 and the Budget Act of 2023 by amending, adding, and repealing items of appropriation and making other changes.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA SB 1063 - Shannon L. Grove
Pupil safety: identification cards.
04/11/2024 - Read second time and amended. Ordered to third reading.
SB 1063, as amended, Grove. Pupil safety: identification cards. Existing law requires a public school or private school that serves pupils in any of grades 7 to 12, inclusive, and that issues pupil identification cards to have printed on the pupil identification cards the telephone numbers for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and the National Domestic Violence Hotline, and authorizes those schools to have printed on the identification cards certain other suicide-prevention and emergency-response numbers, as provided.This bill, commencing July 1, 2025, would require a public school or private school that serves pupils in any of grades 7 to 12, inclusive, and that issues pupil identification cards to have printed on the identification cards the Uniform Resource Locator (URL) for the mental health resources internet website of the county in which the public or private school is located. The bill would require schools subject to this requirement that, as of January 1, 2025, have a supply of unissued identification cards that are noncompliant with this requirement to issue the noncompliant identification cards until that supply is depleted. The bill would authorize those schools subject to these requirements to replace any or all of the required information mentioned above with a quick response (QR) code that links to the information being replaced.

CA SB 1126 - David K. Min
Child abuse and neglect.
04/10/2024 - Read second time. Ordered to third reading.
SB 1126, as amended, Min. Child abuse and neglect. Existing law defines “child abuse or neglect” for the purposes of the Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act to include, among other things, physical injury or death inflicted by other than accidental means and the willful harming or injuring of a child.This bill would provide that the fact that a child witnessed domestic violence or was present during a domestic violence incident does not require a mandated reporter to report child abuse or neglect. The bill would also provide that the definition of child abuse or neglect does not apply to how a child witnessing domestic violence or residing in a household where domestic violence exists is relevant to, among other things, a determination of child custody or visitation.

CA SB 114 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Education finance: education omnibus budget trailer bill.
06/27/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4:45 p.m.
SB 114, as amended, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Education finance: education omnibus budget trailer bill. (1) Existing law establishes a public school financing system that requires state funding for school districts, county offices of education, and charter schools to be calculated pursuant to a local control funding formula, as specified. Existing law requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to annually calculate a county local control funding formula for each county superintendent of schools that includes, among other things, an alternative education grant, as specified. Existing law includes, among other things, a base grant based upon average daily attendance as a component of that alternative education grant.This bill would revise the alternative education grant by, among other things, increasing the base grant component of the alternative education grant, revising the calculation of average daily attendance for purposes of the alternative education grant, as specified, and establishing add-ons of $200,000 for each county office of education that operates a juvenile court school and $200,000 for each county office of education that operates a county community school. The bill would require the Superintendent to allocate $3,000 per unit of average daily attendance for a Student Support and Enrichment Block Grant, as provided. The bill would make these provisions applicable commencing with the 2023–24 fiscal year.(2) Existing law, commencing with the 2018–19 fiscal year, requires the Superintendent to add $200,000 and other specified amounts, that are dependent upon the number and size of school districts under its jurisdiction and that are determined to be in need of differentiated assistance, to a county superintendent of school’s local control funding formula allocation, as specified.This bill, commencing with the 2023–24 fiscal year, would increase the above-described add-on by $100,000.(3) Existing law, commencing with the 2015–16 fiscal year, requires the Superintendent to add $2,000,000 to the Los Angeles County Office of Education’s local control funding formula allocation for the purpose of supporting statewide professional development and leadership training for education professionals related to antibias education and the creation of inclusive and equitable schools.This bill would, commencing with the 2023–24 fiscal year, increase that add-on for the Los Angeles County Office of Education by $1,000,000 to instead be $3,000,000.(4) The Early Education Act requires the Superintendent to administer the California state preschool program. The act also requires the Superintendent, in consultation with the Director of Social Services and the executive director of the State Board of Education, to convene a statewide interest holder workgroup to provide recommendations on best practices for increasing access to high-quality universal preschool programs for 3- and 4-year-old children offered through a mixed-delivery model that provides equitable learning experiences across a variety of settings. The act requires the Superintendent, in consultation with the director, to provide a report to the appropriate fiscal and policy committees of the Legislature and the Department of Finance with the recommendations of the workgroup no later than January 15, 2023.This bill would delay the reporting of those recommendations described above to instead be no later than March 31, 2024.(5) Existing law establishes the California Prekindergarten Planning and Implementation Grant Program as a state early learning initiative with the goal of expanding access to classroom-based prekindergarten programs. Existing law appropriates $300,000,000 from the General Fund to the State Department of Education in both the 2021–22 fiscal year and the 2022–23 fiscal year for allocation to local educational agencies as base grants, enrollment grants, and supplemental grants, as specified.The bill would authorize the department to allo

CA SB 118 - Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee
Budget Act of 2023: health.
06/26/2023 - Ordered to third reading.
SB 118, as amended, Committee on Budget and Fiscal Review. Budget Act of 2023: health. (1) Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law requires a health care service plan to provide disclosures regarding the benefits, services, and terms of the plan contract, as specified, to provide the public, subscribers, and enrollees with a full and fair disclosure of the provisions of the plan.This bill would require the department to develop standard templates for the disclosure form and evidence of coverage, to include, among other things, standard definitions, benefit descriptions, and any other information that the director determines, consistent with the goals of providing fair disclosures of the provisions of a health care service plan. The bill would require the department to consult with the Department of Insurance and interested stakeholders in developing the standard templates. The bill would require health care service plans, beginning January 1, 2025, to use the standard templates for any disclosure form or evidence of coverage published or distributed, except as specified. Because a willful violation of these requirements is a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.This bill would authorize the department to develop standard templates for a schedule of benefits, an explanation of benefits, a cost-sharing summary, or any similar document. The bill would authorize the department to require health care service plans to use the standard templates, except as specified, and would authorize the director to require health care service plans to submit forms the health care service plan created based on the department’s templates for the purpose of compliance review. The bill would additionally specify that the department may implement these provisions by issuing and modifying templates and all-plan letters or similar instructions, without taking regulatory action. The bill would also update cross-references in various provisions.(2) Existing law requires a health care service plan contract or disability insurance policy to cover mental health and substance use disorder treatment, including medically necessary treatment of a mental health or substance use disorder provided by an in-network or out-of-network 988 center or mobile crisis team. Existing law prohibits a health care service plan or insurer from requiring prior authorization for medically necessary treatment of a mental health or substance use disorder provided by a 988 center or mobile crisis team.This bill would instead specify that mental health and substance use disorder treatment includes behavioral health crisis services that are provided by a 988 center, mobile crisis team or other provider of behavioral health crisis services. The bill would prohibit a health care service plan or health insurer from requiring prior authorization for behavioral health crisis stabilization services and care, but would authorize prior authorization for medically necessary mental health or substance use disorder services following stabilization from a behavioral health crisis addressed by services provided through the 988 system.This bill would require a health care service plan or health insurer that is contacted by a 988 center, mobile crisis team, or other provider of behavioral health crisis services to, within 30 minutes of initial contact, either authorize poststabilization care or inform the provider that it will arrange for the prompt transfer of the enrollee’s care to another provider. The bill would require the plan or insurer to reimburse a provider for poststabilization care in specified circumstances, including if the plan or insurer did not respond within 30 minutes to authorize care or arrange for transfer. The bill would require a plan or insurer to promine

CA SB 1289 - Richard Dale Roth
Medi-Cal: county call centers: data.
04/08/2024 - From committee with author's amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on HEALTH.
SB 1289, as amended, Roth. Medi-Cal: county call centers: data. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Existing law sets forth various responsibilities for counties relating to eligibility determinations and enrollment functions under the Medi-Cal program.Existing federal law sets forth Medicaid reporting requirements for each state during the period between April 1, 2023, and June 30, 2024, inclusive, relating to eligibility redeterminations, including, among other information, the total call-center volume, average wait times, and average abandonment rate for each call center of the state agency responsible for administering the state plan, as specified.This bill would require the department to establish statewide minimum standards for assistance provided by county call centers to applicants or beneficiaries applying for, renewing, or requesting help in obtaining or maintaining Medi-Cal coverage. The bill would require promulgation of the standards in regulation by July 1, 2026, as specified. The bill would authorize the department to develop alternate standards for a county that does not operate a call center for Medi-Cal applicants and beneficiaries.The bill would require a county to collect and submit to the department on April 1, 2025 and each quarter thereafter call-center data metrics, including, among other information, call volume, average call wait times by language, and callbacks. Commencing on July 1, 2025, and each quarter thereafter, the bill would require a county that does not operate a call center for Medi-Cal applicants and beneficiaries to collect and submit to the department approved alternative metrics. By creating new duties for counties relating to call data, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The bill would require the department to prepare a report, excluding any personally identifiable information, on county call data, identifying challenges and targets or standards for improvement. The bill would require the department to post the report on its internet website on a quarterly basis no later than 45 calendar days after the conclusion of each quarter. The bill would require the initial report on county call-center data from counties operating call centers to be due on May 15, 2025.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA SB 1378 - David K. Min
Pupil and student safety: identification cards: federal Title IX assistance telephone number.
04/11/2024 - Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
SB 1378, as amended, Min. Pupil and student safety: identification cards: federal Title IX assistance telephone number. Existing law requires a public school, including a charter school, or a private school, that serves pupils in any of grades 7 to 12, inclusive, that issues pupil identification cards, and a public or private institution of higher education that issues student identification cards, to have printed on the identification cards the telephone number for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and the National Domestic Violence Hotline, and authorizes those schools to have printed on the identification cards certain other suicide-prevention and emergency-response telephone numbers.This bill would, commencing July 1, 2025, require a public school, including a charter school, or a private school, as applicable, that serves pupils in any of grades 7 to 12, inclusive, that issues pupil identification cards to additionally have printed on the identification cards the telephone number for the Title IX Coordinator for the public school or, for a private school, the appropriate contact, and would authorize those public and private schools to have printed on the identification cards certain other telephone numbers of resources for Title IX assistance. This bill would, commencing July 1, 2025, require a public or private institution of higher education that issues student identification cards to additionally have printed on the identification cards the telephone number for the Title IX Coordinator for the institution of higher education or, for a community college, the Title IX Coordinator for the community college or the community college district, and would authorize those public and private institutions of higher education to have printed on the identification cards certain other telephone numbers of resources for Title IX assistance.

CA SB 1415 - Steven M. Glazer
CalWORKs.
04/04/2024 - Set for hearing April 15.
SB 1415, as introduced, Glazer. CalWORKs. Existing law provides for the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program, under which each county provides cash assistance and other benefits to qualified low-income families and individuals. Existing law provides for homeless assistance to a homeless family seeking shelter when the family is eligible for CalWORKs aid, including a nonrecurring special needs benefit of $85 a day to families of up to 4 members for the costs of temporary shelter, and a nonrecurring special needs benefit for permanent housing assistance to pay for last month’s rent and security deposits if these payments are conditions of securing a residence, or to pay for up to 2 months of rent arrearages, if these payments are a reasonable condition of preventing eviction. Existing law prohibits the last month’s rent or monthly arrearage portion of the payment from exceeding 80% of the family’s total monthly household income without the value of CalFresh benefits or special needs benefit for a family of that size, and requires it be made to families that have found permanent housing costing no more than 80% of the family’s total monthly household income without the value of CalFresh benefits or special needs benefit for a family of that size.This bill, beginning January 1, 2026, or when specified automation processes are available, and for purposes of determining the family’s total monthly household income for the permanent housing assistance, would require the county human services agency to include any amount that is regularly received from other government and nonprofit housing and homeless subsidy programs and any regularly received private support intended or designed to help the family with housing. The bill, beginning January 1, 2026, or when specified automation processes are available, upon application for temporary or permanent homeless assistance, would require the county to refer the assistance unit to any other homeless assistance services provided under the CalWORKs program and would authorize the county to give priority to the assistance unit for those services. The bill would also require the department, beginning January 1, 2026, or when specified automation processes are available, to collect specified statewide data relating to the provision of these homeless assistance benefits, and to annually submit a report with that information to the appropriate legislative budget committees and post the report on its internet website.Existing law requires the payment of $175 to $500 per semester or quarter to a CalWORKs eligible individual who is participating full time or part time in an educational activity at a publicly funded or nonprofit postsecondary educational institution, as specified, for the purpose of paying costs associated with attending that institution.This bill would additionally require those individuals to receive a one-time payment of $700 for the purpose of paying costs associated with attending that institution, as specified. By imposing additional duties on counties, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law continuously appropriates moneys from the General Fund to defray a portion of county costs under the CalWORKs program.This bill would instead provide that the continuous appropriation would not be made for purposes of implementing these provisions. The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA SB 1525 - Senate Judiciary Committee
Maintenance of the codes.
04/04/2024 - Set for hearing April 23.
SB 1525, as introduced, Committee on Judiciary. Maintenance of the codes. Existing law directs the Legislative Counsel to advise the Legislature from time to time as to legislation necessary to maintain the codes.This bill would make nonsubstantive changes in various provisions of the law to effectuate the recommendations made by the Legislative Counsel to the Legislature.

CA SB 245 - Miguel Santiago
California Food Assistance Program: eligibility and benefits.
06/20/2023 - June 20 set for first hearing canceled at the request of author.
SB 245, as amended, Hurtado. California Food Assistance Program: eligibility and benefits. Existing federal law provides for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), known in California as CalFresh, under which supplemental nutrition assistance benefits allocated to the state by the federal government are distributed to eligible individuals by each county.Existing law requires the State Department of Social Services to establish a food assistance program, known as the California Food Assistance Program (CFAP), to provide assistance to a noncitizen of the United States if the person’s immigration status meets the eligibility criteria of SNAP in effect on August 21, 1996, but the person is not eligible for SNAP benefits solely due to their immigration status, as specified. Existing law also makes eligible for the program an applicant who is otherwise eligible for the program, but who entered the United States on or after August 22, 1996, if the applicant is sponsored and the applicant meets one of a list of criteria, including that the applicant, after entry into the United States, is a victim of the sponsor or the spouse of the sponsor if the spouse is living with the sponsor.Existing law, to become operative on the date that the department notifies the Legislature that the Statewide Automated Welfare System (SAWS) has been updated to perform the necessary automation, and subject to an appropriation in the annual Budget Act, makes an individual 55 years of age or older eligible for the program if the individual’s immigration status is the sole basis for their ineligibility for CalFresh benefits.This bill would remove that age limitation and make any individual eligible for the program if the individual’s immigration status is the sole basis for their ineligibility for CalFresh benefits. By extending eligibility for CFAP, which is administered by the counties, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA SB 260 - Caroline Menjivar
CalWORKs: aid payments.
09/01/2023 - September 1 hearing: Held in committee and under submission.
SB 260, as amended, Menjivar. CalWORKs: aid payments. Existing federal law provides for allocation of federal funds through the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant program to eligible states. Existing law provides for the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program under which, through a combination of state and county funds and federal funds received through the TANF program, each county provides cash assistance and other benefits, including allowances for other purposes such as pregnancy, homeless assistance, and recurring special needs, to qualified low-income families.This bill would, beginning April 1, 2025, make a menstruating person who is qualified for aid under the CalWORKs program and between 10 and 55 years of age, inclusive, entitled to $20 per month to assist with menstrual product costs. The bill would require the State Department of Social Services to work with the County Welfare Directors Association of California and the California Statewide Automated Welfare System (CalSAWS) to develop and implement the necessary system changes on or before April 1, 2025. By increasing the duties of counties administering the CalWORKs program, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law continuously appropriates moneys from the General Fund to defray a portion of county costs under the CalWORKs program.This bill would instead provide that the continuous appropriation would not be made for purposes of implementing the bill.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA SB 290 - David K. Min
Domestic violence documentation: victim access.
07/05/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4 p.m.
SB 290, Min. Domestic violence documentation: victim access. Existing law requires state and local law enforcement agencies to provide, upon request and without charging a fee, one copy of all incident report face sheets, one copy of all incident reports, or both, to a victim, or the representative of a victim, of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, human trafficking, or abuse of an elder or dependent adult, as specified. Existing law requires the copy of the incident report to be made available during business hours, within 5 working days after a request, unless the state or local law enforcement agency informs the victim or the victim’s representative of the reasons why the incident report is not available, as specified. Under existing law, these provisions apply to requests for domestic violence face sheets or incident reports made within 5 years from the date of the completion of the incident report, or within 2 years of the completion of the incident report for sexual assault, stalking, human trafficking, or abuse of an elder or dependent adult.This bill would extend those provisions to additionally require the state or local law enforcement agency to make available to a victim or representative any accompanying or related photographs of a victim’s injuries, property damage, or any other photographs that are noted in the incident report, and 911 recordings, if any. The bill would require the additional documentation to be provided within the same time periods as required for providing an incident report. The bill would extend the time limit for victims of sexual assault, stalking, human trafficking, or abuse of an elder or a dependent adult, and their representatives, to request the documents described in the bill, from 2 years to 5 years. By increasing the duties of local law enforcement, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA SB 331 - Susan Rubio
Child custody: child abuse and safety.
10/13/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 865, Statutes of 2023.
SB 331, Rubio. Child custody: child abuse and safety. Existing law governs the determination of child custody and visitation in contested proceedings. Existing law requires the court, for purposes of deciding custody, to determine the best interests of the child based on certain factors, including the nature and amount of contact with both parents and, consistent with specified findings, requires the court’s primary concern to be the health, safety, and welfare of the child. Existing law prohibits the ordering of family reunification services as part of a child custody or visitation rights proceeding.Existing law authorizes the court, upon making certain findings, to require the parent or parents, or any other party involved in a custody or visitation dispute, and the minor child to participate in outpatient counseling, as specified.This bill, Piqui’s Law: Keeping Children Safe from Family Violence Act, would prohibit the court from ordering family reunification treatments, programs, or services, including, but not limited to, camps, workshops, therapeutic vacations, or educational programs that, as a condition of enrollment or participation, require or result in, among other things, the use of private youth transporters or private transportation agents, as specified, a no-contact order, or a transfer of physical or legal custody of the child.Existing law requires the Judicial Council to establish judicial training programs for individuals who perform duties in domestic violence matters. Existing law requires the training programs to include a domestic violence session in any orientation session for newly appointed or elected judges and an annual training session in domestic violence. Existing law requires the training programs to include instruction in all aspects of domestic violence, including, but not limited to, the detriment to children of residing with a person who perpetrates domestic violence.This bill would instead require the Judicial Council to establish judicial training programs for individuals, including judicial officers and referees, who perform duties in domestic violence or child custody matters, including, among other topics, child sexual abuse and coercive control, as specified. The bill would require the Judicial Council to submit an annual report on these training programs, commencing on or before January 1, 2025, to the Legislature and relevant policy committees, that includes the titles of the training courses being offered and the number of judicial officers that attended each training.

CA SB 368 - Anthony J. Portantino Jr.
Firearms: requirements for licensed dealers.
09/12/2023 - Assembly amendments concurred in. (Ayes 29. Noes 10.) Ordered to engrossing and enrolling.
SB 368, as amended, Portantino. Firearms: requirements for licensed dealers. Existing law regulates licensed firearms dealers and provides that a license is subject to forfeiture for a breach of specified prohibitions in existing law. Existing law authorizes the temporary transfer of a firearm without a firearms dealer’s participation to a person who is 18 years of age or older for safekeeping to prevent it from being used to attempt suicide, as specified.This bill would require a licensed firearms dealer, as specified, to accept for storage a firearm transferred by an individual to prevent it from being accessed or used during periods of crisis or heightened risk to the owner of the firearm or members of their household. The bill would also authorize a licensed firearms dealer to accept for storage a firearm for a lawful purpose not otherwise stated in the law. The bill would make these provisions subject to certain conditions and would establish a procedure for the return of a firearm to the original transferor, including situations when a dealer cannot legally return a firearm. A violation of various provisions involving the transfer of firearms is a crime. By changing the scope of these offenses, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would authorize a firearms dealer to charge a reasonable fee, as specified, for the storage of a firearm pursuant to these provisions. The bill would also state that it has no affect on the liability under existing law, if any, of a firearms dealer who returns a stored firearm to its owner, as specified.The California Constitution generally provides that the Legislature has no power to authorize lotteries and shall prohibit the sale of lottery tickets in the state, except for private, nonprofit, eligible organizations to conduct raffles as a funding mechanism to provide support for their own or another private, nonprofit, eligible organization’s beneficial and charitable works, subject to certain conditions.This bill would prohibit a licensed firearms dealer from offering an opportunity to win an item of inventory in a game dominated by chance and would except from this prohibition nonprofit organizations under certain circumstances.Existing law, subject to exceptions, provides that any person who has been convicted of certain misdemeanors may not, within 10 years of the conviction, own, purchase, receive, possess, or have under their custody or control, any firearm and makes a violation of that prohibition a crime. Existing law authorizes a court in certain circumstances to reduce, eliminate, or condition that prohibition.This bill would, subject to exceptions, provide that any person convicted of a misdemeanor violation of the above-described prohibition on or after January 1, 2024, and who within 10 years of that conviction owns, purchases, receives, possesses, or has under their custody or control, any firearm guilty of a misdemeanor or a felony. Because a violation of these provisions would be a crime, and because this bill would expand the application of the crime to a larger class of potential offenders, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 11106 of the Penal Code proposed by AB 732 to be operative only if this bill and AB 732 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.This bill would also incorporate additional changes to Section 29805 of the Penal Code proposed by SB 2 to be operative only if this bill and SB 2 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.

CA SB 404 - Aisha Wahab
Prohibiting underage, unauthorized marriages.
09/01/2023 - September 1 hearing: Held in committee and under submission.
SB 404, as amended, Wahab. Prohibiting underage, unauthorized marriages. Existing law provides various circumstances that constitute rape, including an act of sexual intercourse accomplished with a person who is not the spouse of the perpetrator where the person submits under the belief that the person committing the act is the victim’s spouse, and this belief is induced by artifice, pretense, or concealment practiced by the accused, with the intent to induce the belief. Existing law also makes it a misdemeanor to sexually assault certain animals for the purpose of gratifying the sexual desires of a person. Existing law makes it a crime to engage in certain types of conduct against a dependent adult or dependent person, including, among others, committing certain sexual acts upon a dependent person.This bill would make it a misdemeanor for any person, 18 years of age or older, to knowingly and willfully sanction or solemnize a marriage or domestic partnership between a minor and another person. The bill would make a violation of these provisions punishable by a fine of not more than $1,000 or by imprisonment in a county jail for up to one year per incident. The bill would exclude a marriage or domestic partnership entered into after receiving a court order, as specified.Because a violation of the provisions would be a crime, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.

CA SB 459 - Sabrina Cervantes
Domestic violence: restraining orders.
10/13/2023 - Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 874, Statutes of 2023.
SB 459, Rubio. Domestic violence: restraining orders. Existing law allows a civil court, after notice and a hearing, to issue an order to enjoin a person from, among other things, attacking, stalking, or threatening another person. Under existing law, the protective order may be valid for up to 5 years, as determined by the court, and may be renewed for 5 or more years, or permanently, at the discretion of the court.This bill would require the Judicial Council, on or before January 1, 2025, to create one or more specific forms for the purpose of requesting a modification of an existing restraining order.

CA SB 489 - Scott Thomas Wilk
Marriage licenses and certificates.
02/01/2024 - Returned to Secretary of Senate pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
SB 489, as amended, Wilk. Marriage licenses and certificates. Existing law requires parties, before entering a marriage or declaring a marriage, as specified, to first obtain a marriage license from the county clerk. Existing law requires the licensure and solemnization for both a public or confidential marriage before a marriage certificate may be issued. Existing law sets the fees for public and confidential marriage licenses and requires an additional $23 fee to be collected by the county clerk for deposit into the county domestic violence shelter-based programs special fund. Existing law also requires specified county boards of supervisors to direct county clerks and county recorders to deposit fees into a special fund to be used for various activities, such as domestic violence prevention. Existing law imposes duties on county clerks and county recorders with respect to public and confidential marriage licenses and certificates.This bill would authorize a city to elect to issue and register public and confidential marriage licenses and issue public and confidential marriage certificates, subject to specified requirements. The bill would, among other things, require a city official to comply with all laws governing the issuance and registration of public and confidential marriage licenses and the issuance of public and confidential marriage certificates. This bill would also authorize a city official who issues marriage licenses to collect an additional $23 fee for the support of county domestic violence shelter-based programs. The bill would require the city official to deposit that fee into the special fund, as described above, and to comply with the direction from county boards of supervisors to deposit fees, as specified. The bill would also make conforming changes.Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to prepare and publish a brochure containing, among other information, information concerning the possibilities of genetic defects and diseases and information concerning options for changing a name upon solemnization of marriage, as specified. Existing law requires the State Department of Public Health to make the brochures available to county clerks to distribute a copy of the brochure to each applicant for a marriage license.The bill would require the State Department of Public Health to also make the brochure available to city officials.Existing law does not require a particular form for the ceremony to solemnize a marriage, but requires the parties to declare, in the physical presence of the person solemnizing their marriage and necessary witnesses, that they take each other as spouses. Existing law requires the person solemnizing the marriage to return the endorsed marriage license to the county recorder of the county in which the license was issued within 10 days after the ceremony. Existing law requires the county clerk to notify licenseholders of the obligation of the person solemnizing their marriage to return the marriage license to the county recorder’s office within 10 days after the ceremony.This bill would require, for a marriage license issued by a city official, the person solemnizing a marriage to return the endorsed marriage license to the city official who issued the license within 10 days after the ceremony and would require a city official who issues marriage licenses to notify licenseholders of the obligation of the person solemnizing their marriage to return the marriage license to the recorder’s office within 10 days after the ceremony.Existing law requires the county recorder to perform all the duties of the local registrar of marriages, including, among other things, examining marriage licenses before accepting them for registration, numbering each marriage certificate they issue, as specified, transmitting all marriage certificates they issued to the State Registrar, and submitting specific information to the State Registrar.This bill would instead require the county reco

CA SB 526 - Monique Limon
Department of Industrial Relations: domestic violence prevention.
02/01/2024 - Returned to Secretary of Senate pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
SB 526, as amended, Limón. Department of Industrial Relations: domestic violence prevention. Existing law establishes the Department of Industrial Relations and defines its functions to include fostering, promoting, and developing the welfare of the wage earners of California. Existing law, the Dymally-Alatorre Bilingual Services Act, requires any materials explaining services available to the public to be translated into any non-English language spoken by a substantial number of the public served by the agency.This bill would require the Department of Industrial Relations to develop and prepare a poster regarding domestic violence prevention that employers may display in their workplace and to make the poster available to employers for download through the department’s internet website. The bill would authorize the department to consult with the Department of Justice as to the content and design of the poster. The bill would require that the poster be made available in English, Spanish, and any non-English language required under the Dymally-Alatorre Bilingual Services Act.

CA SB 541 - Caroline Menjivar
Sexual health: contraceptives.
01/25/2024 - Veto sustained.
SB 541, Menjivar. Sexual health: contraceptives. (1) Existing law, the California Healthy Youth Act, requires school districts, defined to include county boards of education, county superintendents of schools, the California School for the Deaf, the California School for the Blind, and charter schools, to ensure that all pupils in grades 7 to 12, inclusive, receive comprehensive sexual health education and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention education, as specified.This bill would, in order to prevent and reduce unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections, on or before the start of the 2024–25 school year, require each public school, including schools operated by a school district or county office of education, charter schools, and state special schools, to make internal and external condoms available to all pupils in grades 9 to 12, inclusive, free of charge, as provided. The bill would require these public schools to, at the beginning of each school year, inform pupils through existing school communication channels that free condoms are available and where the condoms can be obtained on school grounds. The bill would require a public school to post at least one notice regarding these requirements, as specified. The bill would require this notice to include certain information, including, among other information, information about how to use condoms properly. The bill would require each public school serving any of grades 7 to 12, inclusive, to allow condoms to be made available during the course of, or in connection with, educational or public health programs and initiatives, as provided. The bill would authorize a state agency, the State Department of Education, or a public school to accept gifts, grants, and donations from any source for the support of a public school carrying out these provisions, including, but not limited to, the acceptance of condoms from a manufacturer or wholesaler. The bill would, in order to comply with these provisions, encourage public schools to explore partnerships, including, but not limited to, partnerships with local health jurisdictions, as defined, community health centers, nonprofit organizations, and the State Department of Public Health. By imposing additional duties on public schools, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program. The bill would additionally prohibit a public school, as defined, maintaining any combination of classrooms from grades 7 to 12, inclusive, a school district, the State Department of Education, or a county office of education from prohibiting certain school-based health centers, as defined, from making internal and external condoms available and easily accessible to pupils at the school-based health center site.(2) Under existing law, the Sherman Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Law, the State Department of Public Health generally regulates the packaging, labeling, advertising, and sale of food, drugs, devices, and cosmetics, in accordance with the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. A violation of those provisions is generally a crime. Existing law sets forth various other provisions relating to the furnishing and health care coverage of certain types of contraception.This bill would, with certain exceptions, prohibit a retail establishment, as defined, from refusing to furnish nonprescription contraception to a person solely on the basis of age by means of any conduct, including, but not limited to, requiring the customer to present identification for purposes of demonstrating their age. Under the bill, a violation of that prohibition would be exempt from the above-described criminal penalty.(3) The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reim

CA SB 575 - Aisha Wahab
Marriage: underage marriage.
01/29/2024 - In Assembly. Read first time. Held at Desk.
SB 575, as amended, Wahab. Marriage: underage marriage. Existing law requires the State Registrar to create a document, no later than March 1, 2020, with annual updates, containing information received by local registrar concerning marriage certificates in which one or both of the parties were minors at the time of solemnization of the marriage. Existing law requires the local registrar, at least annually, to submit information, as specified, to the State Registrar for those purposes. Under existing law, a local registrar is not required to submit this information to the State Registrar if the local registrar did not receive a copy of the court order, as specified.This bill would remove that exception and require a local registrar to submit information to the State Registrar, as specified. By increasing the reporting requirements for local registrars, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The bill would require the State Registrar to create a report containing the number of marriage certificates that were submitted by a local registrar, as specified. This bill would require the State Registrar, on or before December 31, 2025, to publish the report on its internet website and submit the report to the Legislature. The bill would repeal this provision on January 1, 2026. This bill would also require the State Registrar, subject to an appropriation, to establish a grant program to study extralegal marriages, as defined. The bill would require a report completed through the grant program to address the prevalence of, conditions of, and circumstances surrounding extralegal marriages in the state, as specified.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA SB 599 - Susan Rubio
Visitation rights.
09/13/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4 p.m.
SB 599, Caballero. Visitation rights. Existing law governs the determination of child custody and visitation in contested proceedings. Existing law requires the court, for purposes of deciding custody or visitation, to determine the best interests of the child based on certain factors, including the health, safety, and welfare of the child, and the nature and amount of contact with both parents, except as specified. Existing law also requires the court to determine, under designated circumstances, whether to require that visitation to be supervised, suspended, limited, or denied. Under existing law, if the court finds that a party is staying in a domestic violence shelter or other confidential location, the court is required to design a visitation order to prevent disclosure of the location of the shelter or other confidential location.This bill, among other things, would require the court, in determining whether to require the above-described limitations on visitation, to consider virtual visitation, as defined. The bill would require a court, if it finds that a party is staying at one of the above-described locations due to domestic violence or fear of domestic violence from the other parent, to order in-person visitation only if the court finds that in-person visitation is in the best interest of the child and taking into consideration, among other things, the potential for disclosure of the confidential location.Existing law requires the Judicial Council to develop standards for supervised visitation providers in accordance with specified guidelines. When developing standards, existing law requires the Judicial Council to consider, among other things, the provider’s qualifications, experience, and education. Under existing law, the term “provider” includes any individual who functions as a visitation monitor, as well as supervised visitation centers.This bill would authorize superior court locations to serve as supervised visitation and exchange locations, and would also authorize the court to designate employees and contractors to provide supervised visitation and exchange services or assistance with those services.This bill would incorporate additional changes to Section 3011 of the Family Code proposed by AB 957 to be operative only if this bill and AB 957 are enacted and this bill is enacted last.

CA SB 655 - Maria Elena Durazo
Victim compensation.
02/01/2024 - Returned to Secretary of Senate pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
SB 655, as introduced, Durazo. Victim compensation. Existing law generally provides for the compensation of victims and derivative victims of specified types of crimes by the California Victim Compensation Board from the Restitution Fund, which is continuously appropriated to the California Victim Compensation Board. Existing law defines terms for the purpose of determining the eligibility of victims of crime for compensation from the Restitution Fund.This bill would make changes to the definition of “derivative victim” and “victim” and would define “victim of violent crime advocate” for purposes of these provisions.Existing law requires an application for compensation to be filed with the board in a manner determined by the board, authorizes the board to require submission of additional information, and requires the board to communicate any determination made with respect to the adequacy of the information received from the applicant, as specified. Existing law also requires the board to verify information with various entities, including hospitals and law enforcement officials, as specified. Existing law also creates a process for the board’s verification of information, including by requiring the applicant to cooperate with the board, as specified.This bill would prohibit the board from requiring submission of additional information solely to verify that a crime occurred, as specified. The bill would also change how the board must communicate with the applicant about the adequacy of the information received from the applicant. The bill would also authorize the board to verify information, but not require the board to do so, and would prohibit the board from seeking or requiring additional information solely to verify that the crime occurred if the board has already received a valid form of verification, as specified. The bill would remove the requirement that an applicant cooperate with the board, and change the verification procedure in various ways, as specified. The bill would also require the board to accept certain information as evidence to verify that a crime occurred, as specified.Existing law specifies how an emergency award may be made to a person eligible for compensation from the board.This bill would establish a presumption of substantial hardship for emergency award requests for relocation or funeral and burial expenses, as specified.Existing law authorizes the board to deny an application based on the nature of the victim’s or other applicant’s involvement in the events leading up to the crime, as specified, and requires the board to deny an application for compensation if it finds that the victim or derivative victim failed to cooperate reasonably with a law enforcement agency in the apprehension and conviction of a criminal committing the crime. Existing law also prohibits a person who is convicted of a violent felony to receive compensation, as specified.This bill would delete those provisions.Existing law authorizes the board to compensate for pecuniary loss, including a cash payment or reimbursement to a victim for expenses incurred in relocating, subject to specified conditions. This bill would change those conditions for cash payment or reimbursement of relocation expenses, and would authorize a derivative victim to receive this cash payment or reimbursement, as specified. By expanding eligibility for compensation from a continuously appropriated fund, this bill would make an appropriation.Existing law authorizes the board to establish service limitations for reimbursement of medical and medical-related services and for mental health and counseling services. Existing law authorizes the board to request an independent examination and report from any provider of medical or medical-related services or psychological or psychiatric treatment or mental health counseling services, if it believes there is a reasonable basis for requesting an additional evaluation, as specified.This bill would remove the board’

CA SB 662 - Susan Rubio
Courts: court reporters.
02/01/2024 - Returned to Secretary of Senate pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
SB 662, as amended, Rubio. Courts: court reporters. Existing law establishes the Court Reporters Board of California to license and regulate shorthand reporters. Existing law establishes that a person who holds a valid certificate as a shorthand reporter shall be known as a “certified shorthand reporter.” Existing law requires an individual to have satisfactorily passed an examination, as prescribed by the board, in order to be certified as a shorthand reporter.This bill would require the board, in consultation with the Office of Professional Examination Services of the Department of Consumer Affairs, to evaluate the necessity of requiring applicants who have passed either the National Court Reporters Association’s or the National Verbatim Reporters Association’s certification examination to demonstrate competency as a certified shorthand reporter. The bill would require the board to submit its findings to the appropriate policy committees of the Legislature on or before June 1, 2024. The bill would authorize the board to replace the state-specific examination requirement with the National Court Reporters Association’s or the National Verbatim Reporters Association’s certification examination if the board concludes that the current state-specific examination is not necessary to establish a minimum level of competency of shorthand reporters and that the examination poses a barrier to licensure as a shorthand reporter. Existing law authorizes a superior court to appoint official reporters and official reporters pro tempore as deemed necessary for the performance of the duties of the court and its members. Existing law also authorizes a court to use electronic recording equipment to record an action or proceeding in a limited civil case, or a misdemeanor or infraction case, if an official reporter or an official reporter pro tempore is unavailable. This bill would instead permit a court to electronically record any civil case if approved electronic recording equipment is available. The bill would require a court to provide a certified shorthand reporter, as defined, the right of first refusal to transcribe an electronically reported proceeding. The bill would additionally require that the court make every effort to hire a court reporter before electing to electronically record the action or proceedings pursuant to these provisions.Existing law appropriated $30,000,000 in both the 2021–22 and 2022–23 fiscal years to the Judicial Council to be allocated to courts to increase the number of official court reporters in family and civil law cases, as specified.The bill would require the Judicial Council to collect information from courts regarding how they are utilizing funds appropriated to recruit and hire court reporters. The bill would require, beginning January 1, 2025, and annually thereafter until all such funds are expended, the Judicial Council to report to the Legislature the efforts courts have taken to hire and retain court reporters and how the funds appropriated for this purpose have been spent.

CA SB 72 - Nancy Skinner
Budget Act of 2023.
02/01/2024 - Returned to Secretary of Senate pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
SB 72, as introduced, Skinner. Budget Act of 2023. This bill would make appropriations for the support of state government for the 2023–24 fiscal year.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA SB 741 - David K. Min
Domestic violence restraining orders: prehearing discovery.
09/21/2023 - Enrolled and presented to the Governor at 4 p.m.
SB 741, Min. Domestic violence restraining orders: prehearing discovery. Existing law establishes the Domestic Violence Prevention Act for the purpose of preventing acts of domestic violence, abuse, and sexual abuse and providing for a separation of the persons involved in the domestic violence for a period sufficient to enable those persons to seek a resolution of the causes of the violence. Under existing law, the act authorizes the court to issue a protective order, as defined, either ex parte or after a hearing, to restrain a person to prevent the recurrence of domestic violence.Existing law establishes the Civil Discovery Act, which governs the rules and procedures related to discovery in civil actions. The act authorizes the parties in a civil action, unless ordered otherwise, to modify discovery procedures by written stipulation, as specified.This bill would prohibit discovery pursuant to the Civil Discovery Act for purposes of the Domestic Violence Prevention Act except when a court grants a request for discovery upon a showing of good cause by the party making the request, as specified. The bill would require a court determining whether to permit discovery to consider, among other things, the importance and relevance of, and need for, the information sought to be obtained. The bill would authorize a court to continue commencement of the hearing or commence the hearing to receive evidence and then continue the hearing to permit one or more methods of discovery if a court finds good cause and grants a request for discovery. The bill would require the court to limit and control any permitted discovery to the least intrusive methods, as specified. The bill would make related intent statements and findings and declarations.

CA SB 773 - Steven M. Glazer
CalWORKs: homeless assistance.
01/25/2024 - Veto sustained.
SB 773, Glazer. CalWORKs: homeless assistance. Existing law provides for the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program, under which each county provides cash assistance and other benefits to qualified low-income families and individuals. Existing law provides for homeless assistance to a homeless family seeking shelter when the family is eligible for CalWORKs aid, including a nonrecurring special needs benefit of $85 a day to families of up to 4 members for the costs of temporary shelter, and a nonrecurring special needs benefit for permanent housing assistance to pay for last month’s rent and security deposits if these payments are conditions of securing a residence, or to pay for up to 2 months of rent arrearages, if these payments are a reasonable condition of preventing eviction. Existing law prohibits the last month’s rent or monthly arrearage portion of the payment from exceeding 80% of the family’s total monthly household income without the value of CalFresh benefits or special needs benefit for a family of that size, and requires it be made to families that have found permanent housing costing no more than 80% of the family’s total monthly household income without the value of CalFresh benefits or special needs benefit for a family of that size.This bill, beginning January 1, 2025, or when specified automation processes are available, and for purposes of determining the family’s total monthly household income for the permanent housing assistance, would require the county human services agency to include any amount that is regularly received from other government and nonprofit housing and homeless subsidy programs and any regularly received private support intended or designed to help the family with housing. The bill, beginning January 1, 2025, or when specified automation processes are available, upon application for temporary or permanent homeless assistance, would require the county to refer the assistance unit to any other homeless assistance services provided under the CalWORKs program and would authorize the county to give priority to the assistance unit for those services. The bill would also require the department to, on or before January 1, 2025, and among other things, collect specified statewide data relating to the provision of these homeless assistance benefits, and establish a statewide stakeholder advisory group, or modify the responsibilities of an existing advisory group, to develop specified recommendations relating to these homeless assistance benefits. By imposing additional duties on counties, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law continuously appropriates moneys from the General Fund to defray a portion of county costs under the CalWORKs program.This bill would instead provide that the continuous appropriation would not be made for purposes of implementing these provisions.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA SB 838 - Caroline Menjivar
Victim compensation: use of force by a law enforcement officer.
02/01/2024 - Returned to Secretary of Senate pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
SB 838, as introduced, Menjivar. Victim compensation: use of force by a law enforcement officer. Existing law provides for the compensation of victims and derivative victims of specified types of crimes by the California Victim Compensation Board from the Restitution Fund, a continuously appropriated fund, for specified losses suffered as a result of those crimes. Existing law defines various terms for purposes of these provisions, including “crime,” which includes any public offense wherever it may take place that would constitute a misdemeanor or felony.This bill would revise the definition of “crime” to include, solely for the purposes of eligibility for compensation under this chapter, an incident occurring on or after January 1, 2024, in which an individual sustains serious bodily injury, as defined, or death as a result of a law enforcement officer’s use of force, regardless of whether the law enforcement officer is arrested for, charged with, or convicted of committing a crime. The bill would define “law enforcement officer” for these purposes. By expanding the types of incidents for which compensation can be paid from a continuously appropriated fund, the bill would make an appropriation.Existing law requires that a person be ineligible for compensation under specified conditions, including, among other things, if the board determines that denial of the claim for compensation is appropriate because of the nature of the victim’s involvement in the events leading to the crime or the involvement of the person whose injury or death gives rise to the application. Existing law requires the board to deny an application if it finds that the victim failed to cooperate reasonably with a law enforcement agency in the apprehension and conviction of the person committing the crime.This bill, in the case of a claim based on a victim’s serious bodily injury or death that resulted from a law enforcement officer’s use of force, as described above, would prohibit the board from denying an application based on certain circumstances, including the victim’s or other applicant’s involvement in the crime, except as specified, the victim’s failure to cooperate, or the contents of a police report, or the lack thereof. The bill, in the case of a claim based on a victim’s serious bodily injury or death as a result of a crime, would require the board to adopt guidelines that allow the board to rely on evidence other than a police report, as specified.Existing law requires that the board be subrogated to the rights of the recipient to the extent of any compensation granted by the board.This bill would specify that the above-described subrogation of the board applies to compensation by the board for any claim, including a claim based on serious bodily injury or death that resulted from a law enforcement officer’s use of force.

CA SB 859 - Marie Alvarado-Gil
Pupil residency: residency investigations: evictions: victims of violent crime or natural disaster.
02/01/2024 - Returned to Secretary of Senate pursuant to Joint Rule 56.
SB 859, as amended, Alvarado-Gil. Pupil residency: residency investigations: evictions: victims of violent crime or natural disaster. Existing law requires each person between 6 and 18 years of age not otherwise exempted to attend a public full-time day school or continuation school or classes in the school district where the residency of the person’s parent or legal guardian is located. Existing law provides that a pupil complies with the residency requirements for school attendance in a school district if the pupil satisfies one of specified requirements. Existing law requires a school district to accept from the parent or legal guardian of a pupil reasonable evidence, to be established by documentation, that the pupil meets the residency requirements for school attendance in the school district, as provided. Existing law authorizes a school district to make reasonable efforts to determine that a pupil actually meets the residency requirements, as specified, if an employee of the school district reasonably believes that the parent or legal guardian of the pupil has provided false or unreliable evidence of residency.This bill would prohibit a school district from requiring updated proof of residency for a pupil who has been evicted or is a victim of violent crime or natural disaster, as defined, and whose parent or guardian previously established residency. The bill would explicitly prohibit a school district from seeking or imposing monetary, civil, or criminal penalties upon a pupil who has been evicted or is the victim of a violent crime or natural disaster, or that pupil’s parent or guardian, for failing to update their proof of residency.Existing law requires local educational agencies to allow a pupil who is a child of a military family, as defined, and a pupil who is a migratory child, as defined, to continue attending the pupil’s school of origin, regardless of changes in residency, as provided. This bill would require local educational agencies serving pupils in kindergarten or any of grades 1 to 8, inclusive, to allow a pupil who has been evicted or is the victim of a violent crime or natural disaster, as defined, to allow the pupil to continue their education in the school of origin through the duration of that academic school year. The bill would also require local educational agencies serving high school pupils to allow a pupil who has been evicted or is the victim of a violent crime or natural disaster to continue their education in the school or origin through graduation. By requiring local educational agencies to allow pupils who have been evicted or are victims of a violent crime or natural disaster who no longer satisfy the residency requirement to attend their schools of origin, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to the statutory provisions noted above.

CA SB 887 -
Consumer affairs.
09/12/2023 - Assembly amendments concurred in. (Ayes 38. Noes 0.) Ordered to engrossing and enrolling.
SB 887, as amended, Committee on Business, Professions and Economic Development. Consumer affairs. (1) Existing law requires the Department of Consumer Affairs to compile an annual report for the Legislature containing specified information relating to the professional licensure of veterans, servicemembers, and their spouses from each calendar year.This bill would instead require the report to contain specified information relating to the professional licensure of military members, military spouses, and honorably discharged military members from each fiscal year. The bill would make corrections and other conforming changes to those provisions.(2) Existing law requires the Department of Consumer Affairs to establish procedures to assist owners and lessees of new motor vehicles who have complaints regarding the operation of a qualified third-party dispute resolution process. Existing law further requires the department to monitor and inspect qualified third-party dispute resolution processes to determine whether they continue to meet standards for certification, including, among other things, through onsite inspections of each qualified third-party dispute resolution process no less than twice annually.This bill would also permit those inspections of qualified third-party dispute resolution processes to be conducted virtually.(3) Existing law, the Nursing Practice Act, establishes the Board of Registered Nursing to license and regulate the practice of nursing. Existing law authorizes special meetings of the board pursuant to a call of the president or board members, as provided, and requires the board to send a notice by mail to board members who are not parties to the call. Existing law authorizes the board to issue an interim permit to practice nursing or a temporary certificate to practice professional nursing, or as a certified public health nurse, certified clinical nurse specialist, or certified nurse-midwife, upon approval of an application to be licensed or certified, as specified. Under existing law, the interim permit or temporary certificate terminates if the applicant fails the examination or if it is issued by mistake or the application for permanent licensure is denied, as applicable, upon notice by mail. This bill would instead require the board to send the notice of a special meeting electronically instead of by mail. The bill would delete the notice requirement for terminating an interim permit or temporary certificate. The act requires the board to establish categories of nurse practitioners and standards for each category, and requires the standards to take into account the types of advanced levels of nursing practice and the education needed to practice at each level.This bill would require those standards to be as specified in a certain publication of the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties, or successor.The act creates within the board a Nursing Education and Workforce Advisory Committee to study and recommend nursing education standards and solutions to workforce issues to the board, and requires one representative from the office of the Chancellor of the California State University to serve on the committee. This bill would specify an initial appointment for a term of 4 years for the representative from the office of the Chancellor of the California State University. This bill would also delete a requirement that the board hold at least 2 examinations each year, would update references to the National Board of Certification and Recertification of Nurse Anesthetists, and would make other technical and nonsubstantive changes to the act. (4) Existing law, the Psychology Licensing Law, establishes the Board of Psychology to license and regulate the practice of psychology. Existing law requires an applicant for licensure to show completion of specified training on suicide risk assessment and intervention and on aging and long-term care by submitting written verification from the registrar or

CA SB 899 - Cottie Petrie-Norris
Protective orders: firearms.
03/20/2024 - From committee with author's amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on JUD.
SB 899, as amended, Skinner. Protective orders: firearms. Existing law prohibits a person subject to specified protective orders from owning a firearm or ammunition. Existing law requires a person subject to those orders to relinquish any firearms or ammunition they own.This bill would require the court, when issuing those orders, to provide the person subject to the order with information on how any firearms or ammunition still in their possession are to be relinquished, as specified. The bill would require the court to review the file to determine whether the receipt has been filed and inquire as to whether the person has complied with the requirement. The bill would require violations of the firearms or ammunition prohibition to be reported to the prosecuting attorney in the jurisdiction where the order has been issued within 2 business days of the court hearing unless the restrained party provides a receipt showing compliance at a subsequent hearing or by direct filing with the clerk of the court.This bill would also require the court, at a noticed hearing relating to these orders, to consider information presented that the restrained person has possession or control of a firearm or ammunition. The bill would authorize the court, upon making this finding, to set a review hearing, as specified, to determine whether the person has possession or control of a firearm or ammunition in violation of the above provisions.Existing law requires specified protective orders related to domestic violence to be served on the respondent at the request of the petitioner, whether or not the respondent has been taken into custody, by a law enforcement officer who is present at the scene of reported domestic violence involving the parties to the proceeding or who receives a request from the petitioner to provide service of the order. Existing law requires the petitioner to provide the officer with an endorsed copy of the order and proof of service that the officer is then required to complete and transmit to the issuing court, as specified. If the law enforcement officer determines that a protective order has been issued but not served, existing law requires the office to immediately notify the respondent of the terms of the order and where a written copy of the order can be obtained, and to enforce the order at that time. Existing law prohibits a fee from being charged to the petitioner for service of those orders.This bill would similarly require a peace officer, as defined, upon the request of a petitioner, to serve and enforce specified protective orders related to, among other things, elder or dependent adult abuse, harassment, workplace violence, or violence in postsecondary educational institutions, on a respondent, whether or not the respondent has been taken into custody. The bill would similarly prohibit the imposition of a fee on a petitioner for service of these orders. By expanding the duties of local law enforcement, this bill would impose a state-mandated local program.Existing law requires a family court to determine the best interest of the child for purposes of deciding child custody in proceedings for dissolution of marriage, nullity of marriage, legal separation of the parties, petitions for exclusive custody of a child, and proceedings under the Domestic Violence Prevention Act. Existing law establishes a rebuttable presumption that an award of sole or joint physical or legal custody of a child to a person who has perpetrated domestic violence is detrimental to the best interest of a child and establishes factors to be considered in rebutting that presumption, including that the perpetrator is restrained by a domestic violence prevention order and has, or has not, complied with that order.This bill would additionally establish, as a factor to be considered, whether the perpetrator is restrained by any other protective order and has, or has not, complied with that order.The bill would, for specified protective orders if th

CA SB 917 - Nancy Skinner
Budget Act of 2024.
01/10/2024 - To print.
SB 917, as introduced, Skinner. Budget Act of 2024. This bill would make appropriations for the support of state government for the 2024–25 fiscal year.This bill would declare that it is to take effect immediately as a Budget Bill.

CA SB 953 - Caroline Menjivar
Medi-Cal: menstrual products.
04/08/2024 - April 8 hearing: Placed on APPR suspense file.
SB 953, as amended, Menjivar. Medi-Cal: menstrual products. Existing law establishes the Medi-Cal program, which is administered by the State Department of Health Care Services and under which qualified low-income individuals receive health care services. The Medi-Cal program is, in part, governed and funded by federal Medicaid program provisions. Existing law establishes a schedule of covered benefits under the Medi-Cal program.This bill would add menstrual products, as defined, to that schedule of covered benefits. The bill would require the department to seek any necessary federal approvals to implement this coverage. The bill would require the department to seek, and would authorize the department to use, any and all available federal funding, as specified, to implement this coverage.

CA SB 989 - Angelique V. Ashby
Domestic violence: deaths.
04/12/2024 - Set for hearing April 23 in JUD. pending receipt.
SB 989, as amended, Ashby. Domestic violence: deaths. (1) Existing law generally prohibits a copy, reproduction, or facsimile of any kind of a photograph, negative, or print, including instant photographs and video recordings, of the body, or any portion of the body, of a deceased person, taken by or for the coroner at the scene of death or in the course of a postmortem examination or autopsy, from being made or disseminated. Existing law authorizes the use of a copy, reproduction, or facsimile described above in specified circumstances, including for use in a potential civil action if the coroner receives written authorization from a legal heir or representative of that person before the civil action is filed or while the action is pending. Existing law requires the identity of the legal heir to be verified by, including other things, a declaration under the penalty of perjury that the individual is a legal heir or representative of the deceased person.This bill would additionally authorize a family member, as defined, in a case where there is an identifiable history of domestic violence, as defined, to provide the coroner with written authorization for use or potential use of a copy, reproduction, or facsimile described above in a civil action or proceeding that relates to the death of that person. The bill would also require the identity of the family member to be verified as described above. By expanding the scope of the crime of perjury, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.(2) Existing law requires the coroner to inquire into and determine the circumstances, manner, and cause of certain deaths, including all known or suspected homicides, suicides, or accidental poisonings.This bill would specify the above-described suicides to include suicides where the deceased has a history of domestic violence. The bill would authorize the coroner, if the circumstances surrounding a death known or suspected as due to suicide afford a reasonable basis to suspect that the death was caused by or related to the domestic violence of another, to conduct the inquiry in consultation with a board-certified forensic pathologist, as specified.(3) Existing law requires a coroner to investigate deaths that occurred under specified conditions, including without medical attendance, to ascertain as many of the facts as possible. Existing law makes willful infliction of corporal injury resulting in a traumatic condition on specified persons, such as a spouse, former spouse, or someone with whom an individual has or had a dating relationship, among others, a crime and provides enhanced resources for the prosecution of those crimes.This bill would require that a death where there is an identifiable history of domestic violence, as defined, be presumed suspicious for the purposes of investigation, scene documentation, coroner evaluation, and interviews of witnesses. The bill would require family members of the decedent to be interviewed prior to any findings being made as to the manner and cause of death. The bill would require that a complete autopsy be conducted where there is an identifiable history of domestic violence and specified conditions are present, including that the decedent died prematurely. If the investigating agency determines that the cause of death was not related to homicide, a family member of the decedent may request an independent review of the findings of a local law enforcement agency be made by another law enforcement agency in the county. By requiring specific investigatory steps be taken by law enforcement agencies, this bill would create a state-mandated local program.(4) The bill would make findings and declarations relating to these provisions.The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.This bill would provide that with regard to certain mandates

Recent Activity Bills updated in the last 24 hours

17 updates

  • CA AB 1780 - Lori D. Wilson
    Independent institutions of higher education: legacy and donor preference in admissions: prohibition.
    04/09/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on HIGHER ED.
  • CA AB 1906 - Michael A. Gipson
    California Law Revision Commission: persons with disabilities: terminology.
    04/10/2024 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Referred to suspense file.
  • CA AB 1956 - Eloise Gomez Reyes
    Victim services.
    04/10/2024 - In committee: Set, first hearing. Referred to suspense file.
  • CA AB 2053 - Josh Hoover
    Pupil instruction: abusive relationships.
    04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass. To Consent Calendar. (Ayes 14. Noes 0.) (April 10).
  • CA AB 2224 - Miguel Santiago
    Human services: special immigrant juvenile status.
    04/10/2024 - From committee: Do pass and re-refer to Com. on JUD. (Ayes 5. Noes 0.) (April 9). Re-referred to Com. on JUD.
  • CA AB 2270 - Brian K. Maienschein
    Healing arts: continuing education: menopausal mental or physical health.
    04/10/2024 - Read second time and amended.
  • CA AB 2412 - Eloise Gomez Reyes
    Healing arts: California Body Contouring Council: practitioners.
    04/09/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on B. & P.
  • CA AB 2432 - Eloise Gomez Reyes
    Corporations: criminal enhancements.
    04/10/2024 - From committee chair, with author's amendments: Amend, and re-refer to Com. on B. & F. Read second time and amended.
  • CA AB 2499 - Pilar Schiavo
    Unlawful employment practices: discrimination for time off.
    04/10/2024 - Re-referred to Com. on JUD.
  • CA AB 2581 - Brian K. Maienschein
    Healing arts: continuing education: maternal mental health.
    04/10/2024 - Read second time and amended.
  • CA AB 3127 - Tina McKinnor
    Reporting of crimes: mandated reporters.
    04/11/2024 - Read second time. Ordered to third reading.
  • CA SB 1000 - Susan Rubio
    Connected devices: access: abusers.
    04/10/2024 - Set for hearing April 23.
  • CA SB 1051 - Susan Talamantes Eggman
    Victims of abuse or violence: lock changes.
    04/11/2024 - From committee with author's amendments. Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on JUD.
  • CA SB 1063 - Shannon L. Grove
    Pupil safety: identification cards.
    04/11/2024 - Read second time and amended. Ordered to third reading.
  • CA SB 1126 - David K. Min
    Child abuse and neglect.
    04/10/2024 - Read second time. Ordered to third reading.
  • CA SB 1378 - David K. Min
    Pupil and student safety: identification cards: federal Title IX assistance telephone number.
    04/11/2024 - Read second time and amended. Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
  • CA SB 989 - Angelique V. Ashby
    Domestic violence: deaths.
    04/12/2024 - Set for hearing April 23 in JUD. pending receipt.
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